Sewing simpleton

So, I did go down later and went digging through their box of patterns. I found a bunch of baby clothes patterns dated in the 60’s that are so delightfully retro I couldn’t pass them up. They all say “easy” on the front, and are by a variety of makers from McCall’s, Simplicity, etc…

They have all the parts of the patterns, still in excellent condition (score!)… but two have no instructions.
I’m a new seamstress, I can’t work without instructions! I feel really stupid. Here I am, staring at the pieces, wondering what to do with them after I cut them. Obviously sew them together; but HOW?
I googled them, but of course no one has any information on patterns made in 1963. The numbers on the pattern envelopes are associated with completely different patterns of the same maker now…

*cries*
I want to make my baby retro 60’s clothes, but I’m a completely useless seamstress outside of cloth diapers. I need a guru to come to my house and bonk me on the head.
Black triangles, dotted lines and arrows (oh my!) – I know what none of it means.
I suppose experimentation and embarrassing failures will be my guide.
Times like these I wish my grandmother was still alive: sewing goddess that she was.

~:) Babs

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9 Comments

  • mrs__smith says:

    Hi there, I finally got my wire transfer and paypaled you for the cloth diaper. I made sure to include shipping info etc. Can’t wait to see it!

  • gax says:

    My mom always cut around the triangles that protruded from the edge of the cutting line. I remember her saying that they denote a spot where stress on the fabric will occur while being worn, and the extra triangle of fabric generally reduces fraying of the material. I could be wrong. I probably am.

    A dotted line usually denotes a fold, whether the fabric is folded in half, something like that.

    The arrow is to be used with material with patterns on it (imagine floating teddybears or other “upright” designs) so that the arrow points up with regards to the pattern. It’s to make sure that you don’t cut a piece sideways and end up with a shirt where the (floating teddybears or whatever) are sideways, lol.

  • maybe

    try taking an old sheet and experimenting???
    GL I cant use a pattern to save my life…just gimmie some fabric and a picture and I fudge along and somehow I do pretty darn well, lol. GL!

  • _melly says:

    Hey thats my specialty! πŸ˜‰ When my sewing machiene is up and running again I’ll have to hook you up! I have one of those old sewing machiene like the kind they use in a mill, its castiron and everything. :o) 60’s reto clothes are the best.

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