Info: Shampoo Free

This took me all day to write. And so, by popular demand…

1/ Why go shampoo free?
  2/ What’s so bad about shampoo anyway?
  3/ How do I go shampoo free?
  4/ What do these ingredients do?
 
  5 / Help! This isn’t working!
      5a/ My hair is too long!
      5b/ My hair has gone frizzy!
      5c/ My hair has feels greasy!
      5d/ My hair feels dry!
      5e/ I have white buildup!
      5f/ My head is itchy!
      5g/ I have dandruff!
      5h/ I have limp or weak hair!
      5i/ I have hard water!
  6 / What kind of herbs can I use to improve my hair’s health?
  7 / Can I use hairspray/colour my hair?

 

Why go Shampoo Free?
  Going shampoo free is easier on your hair’s health, your wallet, and your time. For $5 you can purchase enough baking soda and apple cider vinegar to take care of your hair for months, whereas $5 could barely buy you one bottle of commercial shampoo! When done correctly, your hair won’t smell, feel oily or dry, and be healthier and happier then when you were using shampoo. It will be easier to manage and stay clean for much longer (some people don’t experience greasiness ever again once they’ve returned their hair to it’s natural state). Anyone with small children who hasn’t used baby shampoo will be aware of how, even after days and days of toddler mayhem, even after playing and sweating, their hair does not get greasy. I know I’m always amazed that even after waking up sweaty Tempest’s hair can be soft, silky and smell nice.

Your hair is a very important part of your body that’s often overlooked. On top of accentuating your style and appearance, your hair can give you clues to your health. Greasy, limp hair can be a sign of bad diet while brittle and dry hair can be a sign of malnutrition and undernourishment. If you’re anemic, deficient in calcium or other vitamins, your hair and fingernails will give you some of the first clues. Taking proper care of your hair and returning it to it’s natural state may be one of the best things you can do for your appearance, you may find you’ll learn a lot more about your hair that you never realized you could know!

 

What’s so bad about shampoo anyway?
 
Shampoo is a detergent, just like laundry detergent, dishwashing powder and the stuff you use to clean your bathroom. It cleans out the dirt in your hair, but is very harsh and also takes the natural oils that make your hair shiny, soft and strong. Shampoo wasn’t introduced until the early 20th century, before that many people used soap. Soap can wash your hair without removing as much of the natural oils that shampoo does. Unfortunately, it doesn’t stand very well in alkaline water. When mineral levels in water began to rise, that made soap a messy, poor item to wash with. It causes ‘soap scum’ rings around your tub and on your shower doors. Alkali (hard water) makes the scales on your hair stand up, feel rough and get tangled. When washing with water with a higher alkaline content and soap, the "soap scum" gets all tangled up in your hair, is much harder to wash out, and creates a big mess. Shampoo came out on the market just in time, displaying it’s only real benefit: it behaves similarly both in hard and soft water. Therefore it was a "Superior" product to an old favorite, soap. But it didn’t come without problems. Because shampoo is harsh enough to strip the natural oils from your hair, you need something to replenish them. So, conditioner was born. You need to wash your hair every day not because it gets dirty, but because the oils from the conditioner don’t last and need to be replenished.

The oils in your hair come naturally out of your scalp to nourish it. Stripping them away causes damage, and breakage over time. In a way you do need conditioner, if you use shampoo – because it covers up the damage that’s been done. But you don’t need shampoo in the first place, all you’re spending your money on is a big bottle of perfumed detergent.

Most shampoos contain mineral oil. A byproduct of the distillation of gasoline from crude oil, mineral oil is what’s left over. It’s so abundant that it costs more to dispose of it then it does to package and sell it, so it ends up everywhere. It’s added to shampoos and conditioners to give hair an artificial shine caused by coating it with a thick oil. Mineral oil cannot absorb into your skin like other oils do, so it sits on top and forms a barrier preventing oils and toxins from being released as a normal part of your skin’s lifecycle. This is one of the reasons you’ll find that the more shampoo you use, the more often you need to use it. In the long run, coating your hair with mineral oil makes it weaker, and more prone to damage.

If mineral oil doesn’t bother you, maybe the other ingredients will. SLS and SLFS (sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium laureth sulfate) are skin and eye irritants that also acts as a foaming agent in soaps, shampoos, toothpastes, dishwashing liquid… and just about anything that produces a foamy lather. The Materials Safety Data Sheet cautions to avoid body contact with SLS, it also puts infants and children (whose eye are developing at a more rapid rate) at risk for improper eye development when it’s absorbed through the skin and accumulates in eye tissues. Because of residual levels in internal organs, it’s questioned how safe our current rates of exposure are. "Debunkers", and companies who sell products containing these ingredients claim that the short exposure (shampoo and rinse) isn’t enough for it to build up, and that by itself, in the dilution present within the product, the ingredient won’t cause damage. This is basically true, however neither take into account recent reports (within the last five years), exposure due to the amount of products which contain SLS/SLFS and how often we use them, and the known chemical reaction with other ingredients commonly found in these products. While not carcinogens, both these substances, when mixed with other ingredients commonly found in shampoo bottles, may cause carcinogenic nitrates to form. Using it in moderation, and even in high amounts probably isn’t going to kill you – but it’s certainly not improving your health. The suggested safe percentage of SLS or SLFS to be used in products like shampoo and toothpaste isn’t adhered to as often as it should be.

In its final report on the safety of sodium lauryl sulfate, the Journal of the American College of Toxicology notes that this ingredient has a "degenerative effect on the cell membranes because of its protein denaturing properties." What’s more, the journal adds, "high levels of skin penetration may occur at even low use concentration." 

Interestingly, sodium lauryl sulfate "is used around the world in clinical studies as a skin irritant," notes the journal. The publication expressed additional concerns:

     

  • Carcinogenic nitrosamines can form in the manufacturing of sodium lauryl sulfate or by its inter-reaction with other nitrogen-bearing ingredients within a formulation utilizing this ingredient.
  •  

  • Other studies have indicated that sodium lauryl sulfate enters and maintains residual levels in the heart, liver, lungs and brain from skin contact. This poses the question whether it could be a serious potential health threat from its use in shampoos, cleansers, and toothpastes.
  •  

  • Still other research has indicated sodium lauryl sulfate may be damaging to the immune system, especially within the skin. Skin layers may separate and inflame due to its protein denaturing properties.
  •  

  • Although sodium lauryl sulfate is not carcinogenic in experimental studies, it has been shown that it causes severe epidermal changes in the area it is applied, indicating a need for tumor-enhancing assays.
  •  

  • Additional studies have found that sodium lauryl sulfate is heavily deposited on the skin surface and in the hair follicles. Damage to the hair follicle could result from such deposition.

Links: Material Safety Data Sheet [mineral oil]
          SLS and SLES
          Sodium Laureth Sulfate, ‘Chemical Cocktail’
          Snopes.com piece on rumors that SLS causes cancer.

 

How do I go shampoo free?
  Use one tablespoon of baking soda per one cup of warm or hot water. You can double or triple the recipe if you have very, very long or thick hair. But do not use more baking soda, your hair will become hard, dry or feel brittle if you use too much. You can put this mix in a recycled shampoo bottle, and apply to your hair with warm water.
  The mix should not feel gritty, and should be a liquid. If you have very short or thick hair, you may find it easier to make a paste with a tablespoon of baking soda (or less) and sprinkle it over very wet hair and massage in. Otherwise, spray or pour the mixture onto your hair and work it in. Let it sit about a minute, and then rinse. I personally find it easiest to make a liquidy paste in the palm of my hand with about half a tablespoon, and then sprinkle and massage into dripping wet hair. I have very short hair, so I use less. Experiment and see what works best for you, there are no official rules.

For a typical rinse, make up a solution of one to two tablespoons of Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) per cup of water. Apply to wet hair, massage into scalp and rinse off with cold water. Please note, you don’t always have to apply a rinse with every wash! I personally find I only need to do a rinse every 2-3 washes.

 

What do these ingredients do?
 
Apple cider vinegar is a mild acidic made from fermenting apples, the acid content is usually only around 3-5% in store-bought ACV. It has a lot of health benefits when taken internally, too! When used on your scalp, it helps promote circulation, acts as a natural antiseptic, and dissolves excessive fatty deposits and reduces scaling or peeling of the skin. As for use on hair, it helps to clarify, detangle, balances hair’s pH level and seals the cuticles. Some people are bothered by the smell, but be assured that the smell should dissipate within a moment or two of rinsing. If it doesn’t, you’re using too much in your solution!

Baking soda is the weakest alkali of sodium compounds, it would take using a lot to do damage to your skin or hair. It has a lot of useful properties like deodorizing, leavening (for baking), whitening, polishing and clarifying. You only need a little bit, regardless of what you’re using it for. Just like with vinegar, a little goes a long way. Plain water can remove almost all the dirt you can get in your hair, but a little baking soda can not only remove the rest, but take care of the build-up from hair products, shampoos and anything else you might pick up. Some people find that over time, using baking soda in their hair will lighten the colour – although most agree that if this happens you’re using it too much, and perhaps not using enough ACV. Once or twice a week is fine, even less if your hair is in very good condition or easy to manage.

Use warm water to wash or clarify, this opens up your hair cuticles and helps your conditioner or rinse penetrate the hair. Use cool water on low pressure to rinse to close the cuticle, cut down on frizzes, soften hair and enhance curls.

 

Help! This isn’t working!

Long Hair:
  Comb your hair from scalp to tips before you go into the shower to loosen dirt and detangle. You may need to use a bit more baking soda in your mix (one tablespoon per 250mls/1 cup of water. If you need more, use two tablespoons and two cups, or three tablespoons and three cups. Don’t overuse your baking soda, or you will end up with dry hair! Less is more.)

Frizzy Hair:
  You’re probably using too much baking soda, or leaving it in your hair too long. Try adding honey, or rubbing a little bit of moisturizing oil onto your hair (coconut, jojoba, sweet almond, extra virgin olive oil…).

Greasy Hair:
  Some people experience an adjustment, or "de-tox" period of greasiness as they transition to no-poo. Do not over-wash, it will pass soon! If you’ve been using your routine faithfully and experience greasy hair, try using less ACV in your rinse, cut out honey if you’ve been using it, try switching to a citrus rinse, or use a comb instead of a brush to style your hair.

If you have greasy hair and need a quick fix on a day when you’re not washing your hair, try applying a tiny bit of cornstarch to your scalp and combing through to the ends. Remember, greasy hair does not mean dirty hair, it probably doesn’t need to be washed!

Dry hair:
  If your hair is very dry, you may have used too much baking soda and should lesson the amount. You may also need to use more ACV in your rinse. Also, try smoothing a tiny bit of oil into your hair either after you shower, or in the morning. A tiny bit is all you need. Coconut oil works well, and smells great!
  If you find your hair is chronically dry, and you like the idea of a hot oil treatment every so often, you can follow one of these recipes, the latter is best for dry hair and the former is a hot oil treatment for occasional use :

— 1 teaspoon soybean oil
  — 2 teaspoons castor oil
  Combine ingredients then warm on low heat. Massage mixture into the scalp and hair. Wrap hair in a hot towel for 15 minutes. Shampoo & rinse out.

 

— 1/2 cup of dried rosemary leaves
  — 1/2 cup olive oil
  Combine ingredients then heat up until warm. Strain. Coat the entire scalp and ends of hair with the oil mixture. Wrap hair in saran wrap and a towel over that, leave on for 15 minutes. Wash hair twice to remove the oil. Use this treatment twice a month or when your needs a deep conditioning. Leaves your hair shiny and rehydrated.

If you want, or need the occasional deep condition, especially if you have very long hair with breakage at the ends, you can try a mix with one small jar of real mayonnaise and 1/2 of an avocado. Mash them together in a bowl with your hands until it’s a minty green colour, then smooth onto your hair. Put on a shower cap, or wrap your hair in saran wrap and leave on for 20 minutes before thoroughly rinsing clean. If you’re using this only for the tips of your hair, or for very short hair, half the ingredients.

If you swim regularly in pools, or have very chlorinated water you may find your hair dries easily. To help prevent chlorine damage after you’ve gone swimming, try mixing one egg, one eggshell’s worth of olive oil with one quarter of a peeled cucumber. Blend together, spread evenly onto hair, leave in ten minutes and then rinse well. See also [I have hard water!]

If you regularly blow-dry, stop! Scrunch with a towel and then let your hair air-dry. Curling, straightening or kinking your hair using hot irons can also attribute to drying and breakage. You can also try using a boar-bristle brush to brush your hair with, this will distribute your hair’s natural oils evenly. Though be warned that you don’t need to use it all the time, and using it too much might actually make your hair feel more oily then usual!

White Build-up:
  You’re probably using too much baking soda! Remember, you only need one tablespoon per cup (250mls) of water, for long hair, you only need a maximum of 2-3 tablespoons. It doesn’t seem like much, but it goes a long way. For easier distribution, keep a little cup with some baking soda in the shower and take a pinch and apply to wet hair, then rub in.

Itchy hair/scalp:
  Try infusing your rinse with tea tree, rosemary or lavender essential oils (only a few drops at the most!) Try changing your rinse routine. Add a bit of honey, try a rosemary tea rinse… experiment! For itchy scalp caused by build-up or dryness, try adding a few pinches of brown sugar (not white, as it will dissolve) to your wash and rubbing it through. Be sure to rinse thoroughly. If you use any oils on your scalp (like jojoba, or coconut), stop and see if that makes a difference. See also [I have hard water!]

Dandruff:
  Skin cells flake and slough off the body all the time, normally skin go through the cycle of dying and being replaced once a month. If this process is sped up and the skin cells aren’t removed, you get dandruff. Although the real causes of dandruff are still unknown, most theories involve the sebaceous glands being plugged, or overproducing.

To help control dandruff you can use a mild acidic solution on your scalp, before shampooing, about twice a week.

— 1/2 cup Water
  — 1/2 cup of White Vinegar

  Combine ingredients then apply directly to the scalp. Use before shampooing. Apply twice a week.

If you’re using any oils on your scalp (coconut, jojoba, etc – not essential) stop and see if that helps. Also try adding some brown sugar to your baking soda wash and massage it into your scalp to help slough away flakes. Don’t use white sugar, it will just dissolve.

Limp or weak hair:
  You are over-conditioning! Cut back on how often you use a conditioning rinse. If you’re using hot oil treatments, try going a little longer between them. Think about which moisturizing ingredients you’re using in your routines, and cut back where you can.

I have hard water!
  There are several things you can do if you have hard water, which can be very drying and cause damage to hair. If you can afford to install a water softener, which range anywhere from a few hundred to over a thousand dollars, have it done. If you can’t, use distilled water or boiled water to wash your hair with. It won’t remove all the impurities, but it can make a difference. If you live in the U.S. and aren’t sure if you have hard water, you can try looking at this map.

Links: Explanation of Water Hardness

 

What kind of herbs can I use to improve my hair’s health?
  Burdock: root helps prevent dandruff
  Catmint: leaves encourage hair growth and soothes scalp irritations
  Chamomile: flowers soften and lighten hair
  Flannel Mullein: lightens hair
  Goosegrass: tonic and cleansing, helps prevent dandruff
  Henna: red hair dye and conditioner
  Horsetail: non-fertile stems and branches strengthens the hair
  Lavender: antiseptic, antibiotic, stimulates hair growth, and degreases
  Lime: flowers clean and softens
  Marigold: lightens hair color
  Nasturtium: for hair growth
  Parsley: enriches hair color and gives a nice luster
  Rosemary: tonic and conditioner, one of the best herbs to use, gives luster and body, also slightly darkens the hair. (This is good to use if you notice your hair lightening due to baking soda use.)
  Rhubarb: the root makes a yellow hair dye
  Sage: tonic and conditioning, darkens the hair
  Southernwood: encourages hair growth and helps prevent dandruff
  Stinging Nettle: tonic and conditioning and helps prevent dandruff
  Witch Hazel: leaves and bark are astringent and cleanses oily hair

Most recipes using these herbs call for dried or fresh, you can boil it into a tea and infuse it into your rinse routine (or make it a rinse all by itself). The oils will work as well, but make sure they’re pure, and use very little. A few drops can go a long way!

 

What about hairspray and colour?
  You can use hair products in your hair, but it’s up to you. Be sure to brush them out and/or give your hair a "Water wash" on a daily basis if you use them regularly. Alternatively, you can make your own!

Hairspray:

1/ Chop 2 lemons, add 2 cups water, and simmer in a pan over low heat until lemons are
  quite soft. Cool, then strain through cheesecloth. Pour into a spray bottle, add 1 Tbsp.
  vodka, and shake. Dilute with water if too sticky.

  The vodka ensures it lasts a long time.

2/ Chop one lemon (or an orange for dry hair). Place in a pot with 2 cups water. Boil until half of the initial amount remains. Cool, strain, and place in a spray bottle. Store in the refrigerator. If it is too sticky, add more water. Add one ounce rubbing alcohol as a preservative and then the spray can be stored for up to two weeks unrefrigerated.

Hair Gel (#1 is not vegan, #2 is):

  1/ 1/2 to 1 teaspoon unflavored gelatin
      1 cup warm water
  Dissolve gelatin in 1 cup warm water. Keep refrigerated and use as you would a purchased gel.
 

2/ One cup water
       2 tablespoons flax seed
       1-2 drops of essential oil of your choice.
  Combine the water and seeds in a small saucepan, bring them to a boil and then remove from heat. Set aside for a half hour. Strain through a colander. When completely cooled, add the oil and mix through. Transfer to a wide-mouthed jar with a tight lid (mason jars work well!), and use as you would any other gel product.

Hair Mousse (Not vegan):

     1/4 cup of plain gelatin
     1 cup warm water
  Dissolve 1/4 teaspoon plain gelatin in 1 cup boiling water. Let sit at room temperature until slightly set. Rub into dry or wet hair, and blow dry.

If you colour your hair, you may notice it dulls when you use a baking soda wash very frequently. However, if you’ve been using no-poo for a while before you start colouring you’ll be at a point where you rarely need to wash your hair – at which time your colour may last longer since you need to wash so infrequently. When I used to colour my hair, I’d initially let it go as long as possible without washing to "set" the colour. Whether or not this actually worked I have no idea, but it made me feel better. I also found that I could go as long as a week before "needing" a shampoo after colouring. I haven’t dyed my hair since going no-poo, but I’d imagine I’d have even better results. Alternatively, use a conditioner wash during the time you colour your hair. You can buy "clarifying" conditioner from any pharmacy or grocery store which contains a small amount of mild detergents. If you use a wash-out colour, the baking soda will probably be rid of it quite quickly.
  Using Henna to dye your hair is an even better option to preserve your hair’s health. Provided you aren’t sensitive to any of the ingredients (like I am).

Going "poo-free" may not initially sound like your cup of tea, but don’t be fooled into thinking shampoo is a necessary or healthy part of your body care routine. On top of being excessively harsh, your shampoo may contain ingredients you’re not comfortable having on your body or your hair. To really reap the benefits of healthy hair you’ll want to return it to it’s natural state, and going poo-free is the best way to do it. Try it for a month, and be faithful… see how much you love your new hair . You’ll surprise yourself at how soft, vibrant and clean it will feel.

I’ve been ‘poo-free’ for a few months now and am enjoying volume, shininess and bounce that I’ve never experienced before but have spent years trying to attain. I’ve tried every volumizer on the block. Shampoos, spritzers, hairsprays, mousse and special haircuts to give the ‘illusion’ of volume… nothing worked. Who knew all I had to do was stop weighing my hair down with shampoos and conditioners? My hair has never been easier to manage, and it feels great.

The only thing to keep in mind when going shampoo-free is to remember that as the seasons change, so does your hair. You may need to change your routine frequency every 3-4 months. (Ie, if you washed twice a week, you may need to change it to once).

To read more about going shampoo free, try the Motowngirl website section on "no-shampoo".
To find more fantastic and natural recipes for hair and body care, try Pioneer Thinking.

If anyone has anything to add, or if I’ve missed a big question that needs to be in the FAQ, please let me know.

Two helpful communities to join are and .

Added in 2012
Here’s a few images of my hair over the years:

Three years of no-poo, short hair, bleached and dyed:

Six years of no-poo, long hair and dyed.

Seven years of no-poo, medium length and dyed.

Seven years!

Almost nine years, freshly dyed and long. 🙂

I don’t use henna to dye my hair, I use professionals (I have two friends who are hair stylists and come to my home to do it) though about mid-way through that I was using box dyes for a while. To counteract some of the damage from dying, I use coconut oil after I take a shower and work it through the bottom third of my hair. It really helps, plus it gives it a gorgeous shine. 🙂
None of our children have ever had their hair shampooed and while they have very different hair (dark and thick for my son, very fine and fair for my eldest daughter… my youngest is an infant so we don’t really know hers yet) both of them have very healthy and shining hair.

Comments

comments

Categories: Uncategorized

604 Comments

  • Amanda says:

    hi – forgive me if this is already answered (& I’ll just wait patiently) – did you start the info video series you were planning yet? I think you mentioned you would start with a piece on no-poo & I’ve been hoping to catch it.

  • mhspear says:

    I went no poo a year ago. I have allergies so went with Dr.Bonner’s products including the sal suds for my laundry and dishes. I have waist length, coarse, straight hair. I used to dye it but I don’t any more. I swim an hour a day six days a week at my YMCA. This works for me, but might work for everyone /or anyone else for that matter. I use a preswim cream, made of shea butter, coconut oil and jojoba oil. I put this on my skin b4 I swim. I braid my hair in two braid and rub coconut oil all over it. It is important never to get in a chlorinated pool dry. Dry skin, hair and clothes absorb chlorine. I get soaked and do my thing in the pool. After all my chlorinated bullshit, I shower, with Bonner’s… hair, everything, and rinse my hair with lemon juice diluted in water (1/2 &1/2) if I am going into the sauna I wrap my hair in a towel after I rinse it and go, If not I smear Bonner’s lotion all over my skin and work a touch of coconut oil thru my hair, if I go in the sauna I do this after. Both my hair and skin feel like a baby’s, soft, smooth and silky. It took me a couple of weeks washing my hair with Bonner’s b4 I got it that way. I buy a bottle of Bonner’s sal suds and one of the baby (no scent) once a year, so far the gallon jugs have lasted way more than that. but there is only my husband and me any more. So I spend about $80 a year for all my washing product, I really don’t count the lemon juice and coconut oil, cause I use them every where else. An 8oz bottle of soap, I tried a shitload of types, tea tree, lavender, peppermint, and eucalyptus will last me 3-4 months. You truly use just a tiny bit. The lotions, I really like the patchouli and lime are also 8 oz and last a good 6 months. No matter what u use, it is important to get away from the chemicals, tho if I run out of my preferred preswim, any cheap lotion with dimethicone will work cause I wash it off right after.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi,
    This may have been asked already, but there are pages of comments so…
    I have been no poo for about a week and a half, and intend to stick it out..
    My hair is dry and I just want to know, is it normal in the first few weeks of the transition for your hair to just feel gross?
    I’m hoping, hoping, hoping it will end up soft and beautiful but I just need to hear from people who have done this whether the icky, gross feeling is normal for the first few weeks?
    I use 1 tbsp baking soda diluted with 1/2 cup of water and rinse my whole head with ACV after letting it sit for about a minute. I do my whole head bc my hair is dry, not oily.
    Thanks!

  • Anonymous says:

    I went shampoo free two years ago. I have to say that your post was the tipping point for giving it a try.
    I always feel that I have to properly bite into all the knowledge available on the subject that intrigues me, so I really appreciated the information on why commercial shampoos are poo.

    I have finally shared all I learned on my own blog (http://simplecouple.net/shampoo-free) and left a pointer to your post for any potential readers hungry for more knowledge and data.

    As a side note – it seems that some of your links concerning SLS have died.

    Thanks again for writing this.
    – Ewa

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi,

    I’ve been trying this for nearly five weeks, and within two weeks I noticed that I could wash my hair every three days instead of every two, and that on the second day it was still clean where as before it would be horrible. So I have seen a big improvement, but now I’d like it to be clean for longer, as on the third day it is awful and I use cornflour to soak up the grease and make my hair look okay to avoid washing it. Have you got any tips as to why my hair hasn’t completely transformed? It doesn’t really feel different, it’s just clean for an extra day.

    So some weeks I’ll only have to wash it 3 times, other weeks only two, but I want to have to wash it even less, and I want it to be even less greasy.

    Thanks for reading 🙂

  • Just wanted to say thank you for this post. I found it last January and it was a great help. I now share it with any of my friends who show interested in trying out baking soda for shampoo and tell them it’s the best resource I’ve found.

  • Anonymous says:

    can this make my hair grow faster?????????

    • admin says:

      Only if something you were doing before was stunting your hair growth, which is unlikely. Hair growth rate is generally determined deep in the follicle (and in your genes) and what you put on your hair has little to no bearing on its production rate, afiak.

  • Anonymous says:

    Dandruff (sebhorreic dermatitis to be exact)

    You say to use 1/2 c WHITE vinegar and 1/2 C water twice a week before *shampooing*. Do you mean put this on before using the bottle of shaken baking soda and water “shampoo”??

    Also, I have a niece whose hair tangles and mats terribly. She barely has her hair shampooed once a week, as she’s only 7. ANY tips on a GREAT detangling spray or rinse for her? None of the store bought sprays work. Once those tangles are in there, it’s murder getting them out. We now spray them till they’re soaked and use a giant toothed comb.
    Thanks!!!!!!!
    Kate

    • admin says:

      Re: Dandruff (sebhorreic dermatitis to be exact)

      Yes, when I say “shampooing” I mean the baking soda mix. The white vinegar is for dandruff treatment and shouldn’t be used daily though: it’s a little to tough for constant use.

      Tangles: My daughter’s hair is like this. Very thin and fine, tangles super easy. I use a touch of coconut oil while it’s still wet. You really only need a touch of it, and just work it into the bottom 1/3 of her hair, paying the most attention to the ends. Then fingercomb it very lightly, let it air dry and then comb with a boar bristle brush to distribute the oils. Works like a charm, and detangles something AMAZING.

  • Anonymous says:

    Thanks for the great info! I just tried baking soda as a wash, my homemade conditioner (with argan and camelia oils, yum), and ACV as a rinse – it’s up in a towel now so I’ll see what it looks like in a bit, but it definitely felt softer than usual and less rough/catchy/tangly in the shower.

    A question. My daughter is 15 months old and already has 3A/B curls like me. I want to make sure I’m taking great care of her hair from day one so she doesn’t have to go through all of the tangled hair and frizz horrors that I did as a kid, but I’m not sure what products are safe to use on her. Right now I use a regular natural baby shampoo because it’s tear-free, but as she’s starting to get a rough hair spot at the back of her head, I’d like to start doing something to moisturize her hair. I rub in a drop or two of argan oil after washing her hair to soften it up, but I’m not sure what else I can do that would be safe for her. Since she’s too young for showers I’m careful about what goes in there for her to sit in, and I’m worried that baking soda or ACV will cause problems in her diaper area if she sits in them, even diluted. Any suggestions? Did I understand correctly that you don’t use shampoo at all on your babies and that worked fine?

    Thanks!

    • admin says:

      This method originated in both long hair, and natural hair (AA) forums, so kinky or curly hair is a perfect match for it. 🙂
      I use coconut oil (not too much!) to soften up my kids’ hair if it’s thick or rough, and all three have never had anything but this method and their hair is lovely. 🙂 We usually don’t do the wash until the end of the bath, and haven’t ever had a problem, even with bad rashes already present (no complaining). Generally I don’t start washing hair until they’re old enough to have quite a bit, before that I just use warm water and/or organic soap.

  • Anonymous says:

    I just started to hear about people using this method in the last month or two, and tonight decided to give it a try! I’m trying to grow my hair out longer and it seems even the shampoos and conditioners meant to help repair and stop split ends are making it worse! Hoping that this will help all areas of my hair.

  • Anonymous says:

    Very interesting article, thank you; I’m curious about you dyeing your hair though, what kind of dyes do you use? My hairdresser insists dyes, even those without all the chemicals need to be shampooed and rinsed.

  • Anonymous says:

    This is my favorite link on the subject of No Poo, however, you don’t have any images big enough for pinning on pinterest (my personal soap box, lol) and that makes me sad =( Any chance you could throw in an image big enough to pin so I can pin this? Pretty please?

  • Anonymous says:

    baking soda + water ratio

    I just tried my first attempt at this process with the same recipe on a different website (1 tbl.sp. to 1 cup water ratio), but found it didn’t work well for me. It seems to be too much like a rinse rather than a shampoo/lather effect.
    I notice you said that for short hair you make a paste-like mixture instead of the regular 1 tbl. sp. to 1 cup water ratio. Being that I have short hair myself, I have a couple of questions.

    Is this paste supposed to lather somewhat similar to regular shampoo? And if I wanted to fill a 16 oz. recycled shampoo bottle with this paste, how much is too much baking soda?

  • ciceniamil says:

    Хороший блог!

    Прикольно!

  • Anonymous says:

    simple instructions please

    i wash my hair like every 3-4 days, ita colored and i have harsh water that makes my scalp very dry. my hair is long in good condition im wondering after i use the baking soda do i use conditioner when i dont need acv for a rinse? just a little confused thank you Elisa:)

  • Anonymous says:

    this is awesome!

    I just found this, I don’t ever “splurge” on things for myself, but definitely bought baking soda and apple cider vinegar at the store today. I only wash my hair when my scalp gets itchy, so about every 3 days or so…will it be the same when I stop using shampoo and start with baking soda? Also,my hair is thick and down to about the middle of my back…it gets very tangled and frizzy (probably wouldn’t be as bad if I brushed it regularly, but whatever), should I do the vinegar every time I wash my hair for a detangler? Sorry, but one more question, my 5 year old daughter has what seems to be cradle cap…it’s not dandruff. I wash her hair probably 3 times a week and have been using medicated shampoo on her. It has seemed to help a bit, but I’m petrified of kids making fun of her. Will the baking soda and vinegar take care of that, too?

  • misstessadae says:

    I am so happy you made this entry!

    I have been wanting to do this for awhile now, but I never found information that I thought sound reliable. My scalp and hair are very sensitive to products I use so this entry was EXTREMELY helpful! I am so excited to start now.

    Thank you so much!

  • Anonymous says:

    No shampoo for three years now

    This baking soda wash and apple cider vinegar rinse works wonderfully for my long wavy hair.
    I posted about it here: http://runningwithrocket.blogspot.com/2010/12/hair-shampoo-and-rinse.html

    If you are committed to not having unnecessary chemicals on your body, you will figure out what works for you.
    Mine is pretty simple.
    I’ve been able to grow my hair longer because of less tangling and I love the better curl – that lasts longer.
    Occasionally, I get some white build-up on my scalp – but it rinses out easily and reminds me to use less baking soda. I think that is the trick – less is more.

    I still occasionally use a small dollop of conditioner if my hair in back gets into a rat’s tail. I also use three drops of hair oil for shine although I suspect it helps keep frizz down as well.
    The idea though is to experiment as to what works for your hair.

    Over three years without commercial shampoo,
    Kathy

    • admin says:

      Re: No shampoo for three years now

      You’re absolutely right; the point is to experiment and see what works best, this essay is merely a starting point and an inspiration. 🙂 Congrats on three years! I just got to 8.

  • gen_here says:

    I have been wanting to try this since you first posted about it. I told myself I would after I used up all the free shampoo that I had from my super couponing. However, it has been 2.5 years and I still have a couple bottles left (I only wash my hair 1-2 times a week or it got too dry), and I needed to try something different. So I took the plunge this weekend and gave it a shot. I could tell the difference in my hair’s softness before I got out of the shower, and my natural curl held up much better than usual! I’m working on the “help, my head is itchy” section now, but if I can get that figured out, I’m sold! Will more than likely switch the kiddos over next! Thank you!

    • admin says:

      If you need any extra help, the , or communities are great for it!

      PS. I’ve been doing it now for just about 8 years, and both my kids from birth (Tempest had her hair washed a few times with a Burts Bees shampoo bar, I think, before we made the switch) and I adore it. I don’t think I could ever give it up.

  • Anonymous says:

    starting from scratch

    I’ve been no ‘poo about 2 months now and the grease build up is just funky. My husband asks me if I’ve just washed my hair a lot, it’s that serious. I was wondering about starting my hair from scratch… I have fairly long hair, and I’m wondering if I cut it and go no ‘poo with short to long hair again would make this an easier transition? Has anyone tried it this way? Thank you 🙂

  • pingback_bot says:

    No-Poo: First Steps

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  • Anonymous says:

    How should I clean my hair after being in the Dead Sea?

    (I’ve been shampoo-free for about 6 weeks now.) I’ve washed it twice now w BS/ACV and it still feels like there’s a coating of salt & mud in my hair. It comes off on my fingertips, just a slight filmy feeling when I rub my hair between them. Is this a situation, with 36% saline water, to use shampoo? What should I do? I’m afraid of leaving salt on my scalp. If you could reply with any advice I would really appreciate it!

  • pingback_bot says:

    in which OMG WHAT DID YOU DO TO MY HAIR

    User referenced to your post from in which OMG WHAT DID YOU DO TO MY HAIR saying: […] Sidebar: the reason why I don’t request shampoo is because I don’t use it. Hello baking soda head! […]

  • Anonymous says:

    Thanks for the great article… Question.

    I have tried it for the first time and all for ditching shampoo, but I’ve noticed in the past that ACV burns my skin. This time was no exception. I assure you I used the appropriate amount but it burned my forehead, scalp, and neck like crazy until I had completely washed it off for several minutes. Ever heard of this reaction?

    • admin says:

      Re: Thanks for the great article… Question.

      Dumb question but, you’re diluting it right? Only using 1 tablespoon per cup of water??

      If you’re still finding it burning you, could you be allergic to it? Does diluted white vinegar effect you the same way?

  • Anonymous says:

    Wow!

    I had no idea the stuff was so bad.

  • Anonymous says:

    Can’t wait to get involved

    Hey – I am definitely glad to find this. cool job!

  • Anonymous says:

    Can’t wait to get involved

    Hey – I am definitely delighted to find this. great job!

  • Anonymous says:

    Thank you so much!

    As I’ve just decided to change some things in my life (go vegan, change beauty-routine, etc), you gave me just the right information for getting my hair clean without having to use shampoo.
    Again: Thank you so much and greetings from Germany
    Sylvia

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    Going No Poo

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  • cliclir says:

    Someone members of the hipdomestics community suggested I try going no ‘poo after I asked about any solutions people might have for greasy hair (mine gets a little greasy after maybe 10 – 12 hours) and after reading this post and some of the comments a few times I thought I might try it! I think my friends think I’m insane so I hope it works well for me to prove them wrong! I just have a few questions:

    1) I Left my hair maybe two or three days and used the BS/ACV routine today. My hair was insanely greasy before I washed it (like, I could have styled it to stand straight up and it would!) and I wasn’t sure what to expect after washing it. I thought I’d wash it where I could take my time and so washed it over the bath with a shower nozzle. This’ll sound like a strange question but will washing my hair with the BS while leaning forward (and having all my hair basically hanging over my scalp) affect how well the wash works?

    2) Very related to the first.. After washing my hair and leaving it dry, My hair was still greasy (though to a considerably lesser extent). I’d have thought the “detox” wouldn’t set in straight away.. Was it just a matter of rinsing off the BS a bit too soon maybe?

    3) I know I’m not meant to use a BS wash every day, but I do have a tendency to shower daily. Is it okay to shower (without using the BS wash) daily or would that affect my hair’s oil making?

    4) And last but not least, I’m a school student, so obviously looking clean means a lot. You mentioned rubbing some cornstarch into hair and then combing out. I’m wondering will rubbing talcum powder (or baby powder) in the same way I might use cornstarch, or would that be a bad idea??

    I love this post, btw, it’s… in a word… epic! 😀

  • Anonymous says:

    Greasy transition phase

    Hi there! I just started no-poo, and haven’t used shampoo or commercial conditioner in a week. I used baking soda and ACV on my hair last Wednesday (it is Sunday) with great success. My hair felt great. When I used shampoo, I only washed my hair about 2-3 times per week. I’ve got fine, wavy/curly long hair, and a LOT of it! I’m trying to extend the BS/ACV out to washing once per week. Being day 4 after my last (and first) BS, my hair is greasy, but feels mostly soft and oily, only slightly greasy yucky.

    One question: How do you know when you’re out of the transition phase? I feel like I got lucky and only had a little experimenting to do with the BS/ACV since I did a lot of research before I started. I think if I do BS/ACV again today or tomorrow, my hair will look and feel great. How do I know when my ‘detox’ has ended? Is it how many days I can go until it gets greasy?

    • admin says:

      Re: Greasy transition phase

      Unfortunately there’s no one answer because everyone’s hair is different. 🙂

      Currently I’, pregnant, and during pregnancy I find I can only go about 4 days before my hair feels oily again. When I’m not pregnant, I can go as long as 8-9 with soft, bouncy hair.
      My husband, who has very oily skin, has never been able to go more than 2-3 days.
      This is purely anecdotal, but I’ve found that most people’s average falls somewhere between 5 to 7 days.

      Detox will end when the level of greasiness will go down significantly, and start responding readily to the BS/ACV mix as soon as you finish washing. 🙂 Mine lasted around 9 days, I think… but I was a heavy duty shampoo/conditioner user. Daily heavy use for 10+ years.

  • Anonymous says:

    Water makes my hair greasy.

    I’ve used the baking soda and acv rinse for around 2 months.
    I use acv maybe once every 8 days.
    I have dead straight fine hair.

    Whenever I wash my hair it takes ages to dry, and the next day it’s super greasy.
    Using 1 part baking soda 10 parts water.
    Scared to use more as last time I did my scalp got really itchy and clumps of hair fell out..
    It’s kind of like the water never dries and gets stuck to the ?natural oils leaving it either wet or really greasy. Not sure which of these it is.
    Seems to be getting worse.
    Any idea how to fix this? S:

  • Anonymous says:

    hairs

    i have long, dryish, frizzyish, wavy hair. i haven’t washed it in 5 weeks and may want to start up again, once a week or so. i want to try this but i don’t understand the vinegar part. does it act as a conditioner? a sealant?

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    The Curly Girl Method

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  • Anonymous says:

    If you’re an athlete?

    Hi 🙂
    I’m a skier and so I am training all the time. Do you have any experience with people who are commonly working-out (therefore getting their hair sweaty and gross) almost everyday? because I am an athlete I am always taking showers and my hair gets dirty really fast, especially in the winter when I’m actually skiing, I wear a hat 24/7. If I go natural will it still work even if I have to shower constantly? Also is it possibly to add a natural aroma to the mix to make it perfume your hair?
    And thank you btw I found your article really interesting 🙂

  • Anonymous says:

    Chlorine

    Hello,
    this is day number one of my attempt at shampoo-free-hair, and I’ve got a quick question,
    what should I do/change if my hair’s exposed to chlorine?
    I work as a swim instructor twice weekly and the pool I work at puts a bit more chlorine in the pool than they ‘ought to so I smell like chlorine for at least a day afterwards (while using regular shampoo)…any suggestions would be helpful.
    Thank you so much for this very informative article.
    -Willa

    • admin says:

      Re: Chlorine

      This is just anecdotal, but I’ve found that after swimming what helps my hair the best is a half mixture (so, half diluted, so it’s extra light) of the baking soda and then do a heavy condition. I either use a high quality organic conditioner (no crap, SLS, etc) or I use my ACV mix with some other moisturizers added in. It works very well to not only rid the chlorine smell, but also keeps it soft after chlorine exposure. This works with my kids, too. 🙂

  • Anonymous says:

    Without baking soda..

    So, I’ve read a good number of blogs and articles about going “poo-less,” and I finally decided to try it. The thing is, about 50% said not to use anything in your hair at all, just to rinse and massage every day or every other day. Then, the other 50% uses this baking soda method. I’m in the middle of my third week of using absolutely nothing in my hair, just rinsing. It’s disgusting. I know there is supposed to be this “detox” period, but there is white grease residue left over in my brushes, my hands, neck, shoulders and cheeks constantly feel greasy (my hands, after brushing, often have a greasy film over them). I don’t know what to do. I don’t want to give up early and start using shampoo, so do you think that the baking soda will help my problem? I mean, this is really, really bad. My hair has never looked this crazy before. On the same token, about a day after I have rinsed it, my hair is light, fluffy and full. It also has this new curl to it that was not there before.

    • admin says:

      Re: Without baking soda..

      I’ve honestly never heard of the practice of going completely without… I’d DEFINITELY recommend you try the BS mixture. If it doesn’t work the worst thing that can happen is you try something else, right? 🙂

  • Anonymous says:

    dredlocs

    will this work for people with dredlocs???

    • admin says:

      Re: dredlocs

      I’ve never been asked that before! I would assume it would so long as you ensure the dilution is well mixed and light enough that the baking soda won’t separate and get stuck in your hair.

  • octavialuna says:

    motown girl link =404/broken

    Thanks for this excellent, informative post!! 🙂

  • Anonymous says:

    Thank you

    I loved your information. Thank you for outlining all the potential pitfalls so clearly. I’m completely inspired and have just posted on this myself today (www.iheartnaturalbeauty.blogspot.com). Really fabulous resource.

  • Anonymous says:

    I tried it, and it worked GREAT

    Thank you so much for the information. I tried this last night on my extremely oily, long, fine hair, with a peppermint tea rinse thrown in for good measure, and my hair turned out soft, shiny all the way to the ends, and with a little more body than usual. It had a *different* sort of feel, but it was definitely not gunky, not oily, it was nice. I had been using Giovanni shampoos (sulfate free) but by the second day, my hair was looking phonomenally nappy, like it was making my scalp overproduce oil or something. I can honestly say that I expected this not to work, but I cannot complain and I intend to keep doing it. I also used boiled water for my rinses and final rinse since we have hard water, but I don’t know that that was really necessary. Thanks! This is going to save me a lot of trouble and money.

  • Anonymous says:

    Removed color from my hair

    I appreciate all the lay people who have given their stories about going No Poo, but I wish we had some scientific guidance. Sodium Bicarb is very drying, and opens up the cuticle of the hair; thus the necessity for following up with the Apple Cider Vinegar, which then normalizes the PH.

    AFter a lot of studying about this, I found myself on some hair stylist’s forums and they were mentioning that whenever they made a mistake and over-colored someone’s hair…..they would mix up some sodium bicarb and water to wash their hair to remove the color! I read this in many places.

    Ignoring that fact, becasue I really wanted to try going No Poo, I went ahead and tried it. Noticed immediately that my week old newly done root job was now GONE. My grays were showing. The sodium did, in fact, remove my color.

    It may be great for all you gals who don’t color your hair, but if you do, I think you better rethink trying this. I am going to look for an alternative.

    • admin says:

      Re: Removed color from my hair

      Thanks for your experience! The scientific guidance is well documented, and it is why this method was developed the way it is. The alkaline/acid/ph levels are as well known as the fact that large and heavy doses of sodium bicarb can remove some fresh colour. However, many many many people use this heavily diluted method on colour treated hair without issue… for years! Including myself. 🙂 As is true in many things in this world, small doses can do entirely different things than larger ones. If you aren’t finding something that works for you here, try the community.

  • Anonymous says:

    Hard Water

    I really do want to try this method, but I am not sure if it will do me any good if I am still using “hard water.” I know you mentioned using distilled or boiled water, but will it be that bad if I used the hard water? Thanks!

  • Anonymous says:

    hard water question

    So, I’m pretty sure I have hard water. But just wondering with you…if I were to use distilled or boiled water in my wash and then do a rinse 2-3 times a week with some of the infused suggestions…would it be alright to do the cold rinsing from the tap…or is that still incredibly damaging to the hair? (We live in an area that has the hardest water, as shown on the map.) dawdler101(at)gmail(dot)com Thanks in advance for your help.

  • bvaca says:

    quick question

    First i want to say how excited i am to try this because i have been looking for answers everywhere about my hair!! D: i bought different shampoos/conditioners, i cut hair hoping that that was what my hair needed bc it has been looking Dull and FLAT! i was ready to chop all off! But i read about ACV of some sort of rinse for the hair and found your article 😀 I use a lot of product (thinking thats what i needed for it to do what i wanted!) and i blowdry my hair almost everyday, so im pretty rough with my hair, however i baby my hair! So today i washed my hair with a sulfate free shampoo (bc i had no BS) and then used the ACV for my “conditioner” rinse. Already i felt such a difference when getting out of the shower it felt light and soft! Not heavy and hard! So my question is bc i use products in my hair like mousse, gel, hairspray, etc. everytime i style my hair, does that mean i need to wash with BS and ACV everyday or will i be ok with just a regular shower and rinsing hair with warm water, and only wash my hair with BS and ACV 2 times a week? I just feel like i need to get the hairspray and junk out of my hair at the end of the day or by the next day before i restyle, but i don’t want to over wash with BS either! Again thanks for the article its saving my hair and my wallet!! 😀

    • admin says:

      Re: quick question

      I use product and I also dye my hair regularly and I’ve never found it to be a problem. The only thing to watch out for is silicones (anything ending in “ones” on the ingredient list) which WILL NOT come out of your hair without using a harsh stripping agent, like commercial shampoo. But to be honest I’ve found it pretty easy to avoid those products (plus, they’re pretty gunky anyway).

      I do a warm water “wash” and rinse, just thoroughly massaging my hair, between washes to get any product or junk out. My hair demands I bs/ACV about twice a week for the best results, but your mileage may vary. Everyone’s hair is different. My husband needs to do it almost every day because he has naturally oily skin and hair, whereas I’m much more of a dry-skinned person. Some people can get away with soft, silky, bouncy hair by only using the method once a week or less! Just experiment and see what works best for you. 🙂

      I just washed my hair last night, so here’s an image of my regularly coloured/product’d (ie. abused!) hair after no-pooing regularly since the date of this post:

      • bvaca says:

        Re: quick question

        D: i can’t believe all the junk i put in my hair! And yet i feel naked without ALL the product 🙁 lol Its been almost 2 weeks since i’ve washed with shampoo/conditioner and its been feeling pretty dry, but Im still experimenting with the rinses. also im doing my best to go as long as i can without washing, and my limit is a day! lol! I have oily skin/hair and i have always felt that i needed to wash my hair everyday to feel clean. I tried just washing with water no BS/ACV and styled my hair as usual, and i just felt dirty :/ i didn’t feel fresh lol. So my fear is overwashing bc my hair does feel dry(but that could be bc im using too much BS or what not). So if i feel the need to wash my hair everyday with BS/ACV, its safe to do that? or do i need to learn to get to the point where i don’t need to wash with BS/ACV but only a few times a week?

        • admin says:

          Re: quick question

          It isn’t overwashing if your hair is feeling great when you do it. 🙂 Are you still going through the detox period? If so, try some of the methods to cut down on the greasiness and have patience.

          Remember too that the baking soda wash is ‘aimed’ at your scalp (the ends of your hair really, honestly, do not get that dirty nor greasy). Whereas the ACV is ‘aimed’ at the lower half of your hair, since your scalp does a really good job of lubricating and protecting the hair up top with your natural oils… it’s the hair down below that doesn’t get the good stuff. 🙂 That’s why a bristle brush can be really good to help distribute those oils all the way through.

          Adjust your dilutions (less BS mix, more ACV mix) and try washing every other day for a week or two and see if that helps you.

    • admin says:

      Re: quick question

      I should add for clarity’s sake, that picture is without blow drying or any product. So it’s 100% natural hair as of the picture taking. 🙂

  • Anonymous says:

    Weak hair

    Hi, Thanks a lot. This is very interesting to try on. But I am little worried, as my hair is very frizzy, weak and thin. I have short hair. What do you suggest for me?

    – frizzy

    • admin says:

      Re: Weak hair

      I think you’ll find success with this method even if your hair is frizzy. 🙂 The method originated in the curly girl communities, particularly among African-American women looking for a solution to keep natural hair healthy.

  • pouletnomial says:

    Mousse/gel options

    So I stumbled upon your article through a link from a friend, and I am very excited about going all-natural. I never thought it was actually possible. I use natural soaps and toothpaste, but not shampoo. Since I am running low, this sounds like a perfect time.

    I also just ran out of hair mousse, which is what I have a question about. You say in the recipe to use 1/4 cup gelatin, but then you say to use 1/4 tsp. Could you clear that up for me? Also, is it something you can store for future use? If not maybe I’ll just make the flax seed gel. That sounded pretty good.

    I have been using mousses made for curls such as Herbal Essences or Aussie, as well as Aussie shampoos. So I’m hoping to find a natural way to mousse as well, since I feel like it won’t match well with no-poo. Thoughts? Thanks very much!!

    • admin says:

      Re: Mousse/gel options

      It’s been a looooonnnggg time sine I wrote this, so unfortunately I couldn’t tell you if I meant 1/4 tsp or 1/4 cup, but probably the latter. You can always do a little Googling and you’ll probably come up with some better recipes than I have here.
      Or, join the or communities and look through their tags and memories!

  • Anonymous says:

    Lemon Juice

    Have you tried using lemon juice instead of vinegar? I’ve been doing the baking soda/vinegar approach for a while now, but my husband has kept complaining about the vinegar smell. I decided to try lemon juice instead (same ratio to water as the acv) because like vinegar, it is an acid and should give about the same results. So, I must tell you that it works just fine for me and nobody gags at the smell.

  • Anonymous says:

    thanks!

    I really like the expressions on folks faces when i tell them i’ve gone no-poo. I like it when people notice how wonderful my hair is even more.
    Thanks for exposing me to this. I am one month No Poo

  • Day one of no_poo goes well. I was surprised how easy it was to brush my hair while it was wet, not having used any conditioner. 🙂

  • Anonymous says:

    This is just great!!!!!

    Hi Babyslime – greetings from Australia!! I stumbled upon this when i was googling for a home-made deodorant recipe, and what a find! Babyslime – you’re a legend! I’ve been washing my hair by this method for about a month now and I’m totally rapt. My hair used to get greasy and have that stinky “hair” smell after only a day. I tried several organic shampoos and was never satisfied with any of them. Using BS/ACV is just the best thing – no more grease, no more stink, and it’s easy peasy and cheap too. Thanks heaps for sharing this around.

    I do have a question though (probably a silly one). I get my hair coloured by my hairdresser, and they always shampoo after each cut and/or colour – it’s salon policy to wash your hair before cutting it. I really don’t want to have shampoo touching my glorious poo-free tresses again. How do you handle this? Do you have a similar issue when you get a cut? I don’t know if I can take my humble bottles of BS/ACV to the salon and ask them to use them instead??

    Look forward to your reply.
    Kind regards
    Jane

  • Anonymous says:

    This is just great!!!!!

    Hi Babyslime – greetings from Australia!! I stumbled upon this when i was googling for a home-made deodorant recipe, and what a find! Babyslime – you’re a legend! I’ve been washing my hair by this method for about a month now and I’m totally rapt. My hair used to get greasy and have that stinky “hair” smell after only a day. I tried several organic shampoos and was never satisfied with any of them. Using BS/ACV is just the best thing – no more grease, no more stink, and it’s easy peasy and cheap too. Thanks heaps for sharing this around.

    I do have a question though (probably a silly one). I get my hair coloured by my hairdresser, and they always shampoo after each cut and/or colour – it’s salon policy to wash your hair before cutting it. I really don’t want to have shampoo touching my glorious poo-free tresses again. How do you handle this? Do you have a similar issue when you get a cut? I don’t know if I can take my humble bottles of BS/ACV to the salon and ask them to use them instead??

    Look forward to your reply.
    Kind regards
    Jane

    • admin says:

      Re: This is just great!!!!!

      Apparently this essay gets around! I originally wrote it to answer a few curious noters but it’s been republished about 500 times now!

      I’ve never actually had a problem just telling the salon that I simply don’t want a shampoo, for whatever reason. If you want to be a real brat about it you can say the ingredient content comprimises your beliefs. 😉
      The one time I made an exception was for a shampoo that was totally organic, no chemicals, no surfactants, etc so I know it wouldn’t leave a residue in my hair.

    • admin says:

      Re: This is just great!!!!!

      Apparently this essay gets around! I originally wrote it to answer a few curious noters but it’s been republished about 500 times now!

      I’ve never actually had a problem just telling the salon that I simply don’t want a shampoo, for whatever reason. If you want to be a real brat about it you can say the ingredient content comprimises your beliefs. 😉
      The one time I made an exception was for a shampoo that was totally organic, no chemicals, no surfactants, etc so I know it wouldn’t leave a residue in my hair.

  • Anonymous says:

    Vinegar vs. Apple Cider Vinegar

    Can you use distilled white vinegar or is it necessary to use ACV in the rinse?

    Sorry if you’ve already been asked this – 497 comments is a lot to read. 🙂

    I’m excited to start with my no-poo system!

    Kaci

    • admin says:

      Re: Vinegar vs. Apple Cider Vinegar

      I’m a little rusty on the science, but I believe this had to do with the acidity – you CAN use white vinegar, but it’s a little strong and it doesn’t condition the same way ACV does. I wouldn’t use it regularly. It’s more for a dandruff or occasional solution. Not to be used for every wash.
      However, the ACV is milder; more conditioning – perfect for using every time. 🙂

    • admin says:

      Re: Vinegar vs. Apple Cider Vinegar

      I’m a little rusty on the science, but I believe this had to do with the acidity – you CAN use white vinegar, but it’s a little strong and it doesn’t condition the same way ACV does. I wouldn’t use it regularly. It’s more for a dandruff or occasional solution. Not to be used for every wash.
      However, the ACV is milder; more conditioning – perfect for using every time. 🙂

  • Anonymous says:

    Question about citrus rinse to help with grease in beginning

    Hi there. You mention a citrus rinse if we are still battling the oil after that detox period. I am going onto week 3 and there is no let up on the oil. As it stands, I am washing every day (2-3 days in a row and then giving my hair a break). I am using 1tblsp of baking soda to 1 cup water + 1tblsp ACV to 1 cup water. Thanks!!! please email jessicawelch @ mac . com – no spaces.

  • Anonymous says:

    Thanks!

    Great info! I’m going no-poo starting today. Already bought vinegar and baking soda. Will report back.

  • Anonymous says:

    apple cider vinegar

    hiya! i have been using B-soda and AC vinegar for over a month now with wonderful results. the soda seemed to keep my hair dryer, as in not oily if i didn’t shampoo every day, which i always do with conventional and even organic shampoo. the apple cider vinegar was a nice rinse to get any dust or city air out. the vinegar made my hair so nice and smooth and soft.
    i was even using the soda as a face and body scrub, then rinsing with the diluted apple cider vinegar too. again quite nice, and i kept fresh smelling, even when we had excessive heat!

  • Anonymous says:

    No Poo Method – Bad Dryness

    Hi,

    My name is Brandon.

    I been doing the no-poo method for over about 2 months now. I wash my hair with the 1tbs/bs in 1 cup warm water (pour/rub in hair) and rinse with a white vinegar mixture twice a week. I consistently get large flakes off my scalp and seems like very bad dandruff. My scalp is so dry that it actually becomes red in some spots.

    I tried a hot olive oil treatment, and I had no flakes for about 2 days and they came back.

    I put no products in my hair, but I wish I could becuase my hair is extremely curly and becomes frizzy without gel.

    Is there something I am doing wrong or not doing at all? Is the white vinegar fine to use instead of the apple cider version after the baking soda wash?

    Yikes, help!

    • admin says:

      Re: No Poo Method – Bad Dryness

      I would try doing the ACV afterward every time, to make sure your scalp is in balance. The dryness is probably from that. 🙂
      If I’ve misread, then I’d try increasing the ACV mix (IE. try 1.5 tblsp to a cup of water, or 2 tbsp).
      You can also try rubbing oil into your scalp (coconut or jojoba works well) and brushing with a boar bristle brush to redistribute and spread it around.

  • giggalz says:

    questions?

    okay i’ve just started doing no poo for about 5 days now…i’ve been doing it everyday…i thought maybe i could try that then cut back after a week or two….i have very short hair thats like a bob but curly…so i use a mouse…now i’ve been doing the 1 tbsp of BS and then the 1 tbsp of ACV rinse…twice i’ve put in a drop or two of tea tree oil in the ACV rinse…now i’m confused when i wash with the BS i get the soft feel of it…but when i wash it out and even after the rinse…it feels like straw…why though? i end up putting a leave in conditioner because i cant run my fingers through my hair..and i’ve always been able to especially with my short hair..i’ve heard of doing lemon juice as a rinse as well..does this also work like the AVC without the strong smell lol???

    so far its okay i just dont like the straw feeling and losing a little bit more hair then i normally do..but once its dry its way better..i’ve noticed its oily/waxy at the roots…i’ve read a lot of stuff about people and waxy like buildup…but nothing to get rid of it..everything seems to contradict something else..and its confusing..i also have a friend who has been doing this for 15 months now..she’s trying to help me out..but i have no idea what to when i’m not washing my hair..cause of the products..i dont know i’m lost..everyone writes so much on this of what they do …so whats the real thing..the real answer..sorry for the confusion in all..but i’m just getting lost in all of the different contradicting answers….

  • lykenoway says:

    So I was getting all into this, and I was wondering, if you don’t have ACV, can you just use water. Money is tight now.

    Thanks!

    • astash says:

      I was worried that apple cider vinegar might be pricey also. However I just got back from Safeway (gonna try my first shampoo free today! XD) and the apple cider vinegar was only $2.40 for 32oz or $4.44 for a gallon(128oz).

      Either choice, using only 1-2 tablespoons per rinse will last for quite a while. 😀

    • bvaca says:

      I wouldn’t

      Baking soda cleans the junk out of your hair and leaves my hair dry and hard when i rinse with just water. Thats where the ACV comes in to help balance and condition your hair, you definitely need to “condition” after the baking soda, otherwise you’re gonna have super dry hair :/

  • Hi there! Great post, I think I will try this soon. I have psoriasis on my scalp, and I find that commercial shampoos irritate it. I’m just wondering: my sister has very thin hair that gets greasy quickly – do you think this would help her? It wouldn’t make it worse?

  • kimsw0rld says:

    Hi! Checking if you still answer questions…looks like it has been a while since one has been asked o.O
    But I was wondering…I just want my hair to grow longer faster. Do you think I should try this method?? Will it work?
    Also, I just stop using shampoo and conditioner altogether? And start to use this every other day or what?

    • admin says:

      Baking soda and vinegar will have no more or less effect on your hair’s growth rate than any other method, so if that’s all you’re looking for – rather than simply healthier hair – you’ll probably be wanting to look elsewhere. 🙂

      If you are using this method: yes you will stop with shampoo/conditioner traditionally and switch exclusively to this.

  • Anonymous says:

    Thank you!

    Your post is amazing! So much useful information along with the recipes for shampoo/rinse/etc. I love it!
    Thank you for posting this, as you can see, you’re helping people even after 5 years of writing it 🙂
    Have a nice week, Estrella

  • yumemoon says:

    treadmill running & no poo

    Hi there, I found your article yesterday and tried the method yesterday, and I’m writing today to say it’s AWESOME. I can already tell a big difference.

    I have a question for you: I run the treadmill 3 to 4 times a week, which makes my long hair & scalp damp from sweat. I am hoping to cut down on the number of washes I do (used to wash hair every day), so would you recommend using the baking soda mix to clean it after working out or plain water?

    Thanks for posting this! Really great information. =)

    • admin says:

      Re: treadmill running & no poo

      I’d try just a thorough massage with warm water. If that’s not working for you, you can try a vinegar rinse to get the sweat out. Either the normal dilution of ACV or even a light dilution of white vinegar! I hear from others that works for them in those instances. 🙂

  • Anonymous says:

    Organic Apple Cider Vinegar

    I started doing shampoo free following the recommendations of this site back in October of last year. After awhile, I felt like my hair wasn’t feeling as soft and clean as it used to when I first started. Switching to Bragg’s Organic Apple Cider Vinegar made a HUGE difference for me! My hair feels very soft and I’m finally seeing the results of being able to go several days without washing it like I had heard about. When I was using supermarket apple cider vinegar I still felt like I had to wash it every other day. Supermarket vinegar has been heated and pasteurized and lost a lot of its good stuff – the “mother” protein. Now I feel like shampoo free is absolutely perfect for me.

  • Anonymous says:

    hard water

    You may not be aware of how damaging the salt in the water softeners can be to the environment. I live in a hard water area and we have chosen not to have one installed. Maybe there are other solutions that you could pass on for this particular problem. For the people you are most likely talking to, this isn’t a good, safe, environmental solution.

    • admin says:

      Re: hard water

      That’s true, I did not know that! Since you have chosen alternative methods, I’m sure you have advice on alternative methods to deal with this problem as it does affect a lot more than just hair. 🙂

  • Anonymous says:

    No shampoo

    I´m now on second month of no-shampoo. I must say it´s great for my scalp and hair.
    My scalp was itchy, probably because of the chemicals in shampoos. I had to wash my hair every second day and I hated it. Now it got much better with no shampoo, my scalp is not itchy and now I need to wash my hair only twice a week.
    Once a week i use an oil-mask before washing. I mix a bit lavender oil, one teaspoon of coconut oil and one tsp of cereal germ oil. i heat the mixture until warm, massage into scalp and leave for about 1/2 hour.
    Today I also applied a whey mask with little bit of olive oil and it´s even better.

  • Anonymous says:

    Wow, I never thought of this!

    Being an organic junkie and a natural skin care manufacturer, I couldn’t help thinking to myself “gosh, why haven’t I thought of this no ‘poo method before?”. To top it off, I’m a bicarb fanatic – I use it for everything, first using it to rinse that stiff lacquer out of my sky-high hair (I was an 80’s teenager!). So I gave the no ‘poo method a try this week. Rinsed with a mixture of apple cider vinegar, tea tree, manuka and lavender essential oil (scalp issues). After just this one time without shampoo or conditioner (and I was seriously skeptical), my scalp feels wonderful and my hair is smoother – with very little frizz. Unbelievable! I’m going to keep doing this and see where it leads…hopefully I’ll never need to buy “anti-frizz” anything again! Thank you so much for the info…

  • Anonymous says:

    baby skin reaction

    I had been using baking soda and ACV for a few months, but just had a baby and noticed that his face and scalp were breaking out terribly where his skin touched my shoulder-length hair. As a trial to be sure it was ACV, I stopped using it for a week and went back to regular shampoo, and his rash got better. Can you recommend anything less harsh than apple cider vinegar as a rinse for my hair?

    • admin says:

      Re: baby skin reaction

      ACV is actually used as an allergy remedy, so I’d be more inclined to think it’s the brand you’re using, or coincidence. Do a patch test by taking a sterile cotton swab and swabbing a spot on his skin with ACV and see what happens.

  • Anonymous says:

    Waxy Hair

    Hello. I started using homemade shampoo this week and I am now considering your method. I have VERY dry, VERY brittle, VERY over processed hair with a gazillion split ends. I am going to try to stop all that. My hair is curly, but not in a good way. When I don’t straighten or put curls in it with a curling iron…I look like a dog with matted hair. Anyways, I did a conditioning mask and then washed with castile soap, glycerin & lavender water mix. My hair now feels like it has a very thick wax on it and is horribly tangled. (My hair doesn’t usually tangle.) I did an ACV rinse & then washed with some baking soda in regular shampoo this morning, but it still feels like a heavy layer of wax is coating my hair. I have no idea what to do. I really want to go no ‘poo, but don’t know how to get rid of the waxy feeling. I am also thinking about hennaing my hair this weekend as I understand it is very conditioning, provides red color (I LOVE RED HAIR!) and provides a seal over the cuticle. What should I do about the waxy feeling? Is it safe to henna? (It’s been about 2 months since I dyed my hair.)I put olive oil on it at night, but nothing is helping. My hair is also shedding out WAY more than normal. I know it is because it is over processed. I really want to nurture it back to health, but I feel like maybe I made the wrong choice with homemade shampoo because it seems to have made it worse. Any advice/guidance you can offer would be VERY welcomed.
    Thank you, Dawn

    • admin says:

      Re: Waxy Hair

      I know that the no_poo community here on LJ has tons of experts on exactly this kind of issue, and extensive tags and memories too – you might try there for some personal anecdotes and advice!

  • chasesmum says:

    Thank you!

    I have been trying this method for over a month. I have beening using way to much baking soda and it made my scalp so itchy and gave me brittle hair. A few sites I found told me to make a paste and being used to using conventional shampoo, I figured I need to use a lot to get the job done.
    Thank you so much for posting this. I just ran to the bathroom to try this formula out.I have a good feeling about it this time.
    Also thank you for helping me to discover I have hard water. I was always wondering what the white build up was on my pots. hehe. Thanks a bunch!
    Angela

  • Anonymous says:

    Gelatin

    I just tried this over the weekend and loved the results, however I found it difficult to work with such a liquid formula for both the BS and ACV. Is it possible to add gelatin or a thickener to either solution in order to get a more viscous mixture to stay on your head? I don’t know how gelatin would react to either BS or ACV or if it will even set up with those in it. Any suggestions?

    Thanks.

  • Anonymous says:

    smell

    Hi!

    sounds really interesting this no-poo thing!!
    would there be some trick to make hair smell nice after washing?

  • Anonymous says:

    Help! My hair is sticking together

    Hi – I’ve been doing this for a few months now and am really excited about it. But just in the last month or so my hair has become really difficult to brush out – like it wants nothing more than to stick together. I’ve tried every ratio of baking soda and cider and I can think of. My hair also feels a little on the dry side. (though before no-shampoo it was always quick to grease up) I’d like to continue but it’s so frustrating to brush. Do you have any suggestions for what I might try for this problem? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. I’d love to have the soft shiny hair I know must be possible somehow.

    • admin says:

      Re: Help! My hair is sticking together

      How long have you tried the new ratios for? You’ll have to try them for at least a week or two to make sure they’re “not doing anything” if your hair is reacting this way. It sounds like you might be using too much baking soda for your hair, I’d cut it down to half, leave your ACV mix as is and just try that for two weeks and see how you are at the end of it.
      if you’re still not getting any results, I’d try asking this question in the nopoo community on LJ. 🙂

  • Anonymous says:

    Thin, fine hair!

    Hi! First off, I can’t believe you’re still getting comments this long after your post!!

    I’ve been going no-poo for about 4 weeks now. I was previously a daily washer/conditioner due to having fine, thin hair that gets super greasy without a wash. Since going no-poo and using the BS wash/ACV rinse, I’ve been trying to only wash every other day. My hair STILL looks horrible on the days I don’t wash. Any suggestions?

    Kim

    • admin says:

      Re: Thin, fine hair!

      For thin hair, some people find that less ACV is more. 🙂 Try cutting your ACV mix in half (instead of 1tbsp per 1 cup, try 1/2 tbsp per 1 cup) on your wash days, wait a week and see how that does.

  • Anonymous says:

    Tea 😀

    I think I remember reading a comment on here that asked about tea, and I can’t seem to find it… I’m sorry to trouble you about this, but when you’re using a tea rinse do I use green tea (or some other random tea, that’s lying around this tea nut’s house!)? And if so, have you ever experimented with earl grey, chamomile, etc… Or would it make a difference?
    Thank you as well for putting up such detailed instructions about the baking soda, and ACV!

  • Anonymous says:

    Tea 😀

    I think I remember reading a comment on here that asked about tea, and I can’t seem to find it… I’m sorry to trouble you about this, but when you’re using a tea rinse do I use green tea (or some other random tea, that’s lying around this tea nut’s house!)? And if so, have you ever experimented with earl grey, chamomile, etc… Or would it make a difference?
    Thank you as well for putting up such detailed instructions about the baking soda, and ACV!

  • Anonymous says:

    Hard water?

    According to my mom, our area has hard water…
    Any suggestions? Is is ok to use hard water in no ‘poo?
    Should I boil it first, and wait for it to be a nice enough temp. to use?
    Any answers are very appreciated!

  • Anonymous says:

    Hard water?

    According to my mom, our area has hard water…
    Any suggestions? Is is ok to use hard water in no ‘poo?
    Should I boil it first, and wait for it to be a nice enough temp. to use?
    Any answers are very appreciated!

  • Anonymous says:

    How Long?

    How long (on average) would you say the period of time lasts, where your hair is greasy from adujusting to not using shampoo?(sorry, for any spelling mistakes along the way…) If you’re not sure, then how long would you say it took for you? I know that everyone’s will be different, but judging from what I’ve heard, I have similar hair as yours… a rough aproximation would be fine, and thank you!

  • Anonymous says:

    How Long?

    How long (on average) would you say the period of time lasts, where your hair is greasy from adujusting to not using shampoo?(sorry, for any spelling mistakes along the way…) If you’re not sure, then how long would you say it took for you? I know that everyone’s will be different, but judging from what I’ve heard, I have similar hair as yours… a rough aproximation would be fine, and thank you!

    • admin says:

      Re: How Long?

      It’s true: everyone is different. It depends widely based on your hair health, condition, type, and your shampoo/conditioner use (even the brand) beforehand.
      I was a heavy shampoo/conditioner user, daily, with deep conditioning shampoos and I have pretty thick, processed and straight hair… my detox period took around 1.5 weeks, maybe a touch more. Nothing memorable. 🙂

      • Anonymous says:

        Re: How Long?

        Thank you once again. I use Burts Bees shampoo for my hair, and not very much at at all! I was worried for a moment… I thought it could take 4-5 weeks! I’m only 14, so I’m trying to make my mom let me do this… but since the detox process is only around 1-2 weeks long depending on hair type, I’m sure I could convince her to let me do it over the summer break! (That, or I could do it behind her back, if she opposes… and if she catches me in the act, then I only have to wait 4 more years! Lolz!)

      • Anonymous says:

        Re: How Long?

        Thank you once again. I use Burts Bees shampoo for my hair, and not very much at at all! I was worried for a moment… I thought it could take 4-5 weeks! I’m only 14, so I’m trying to make my mom let me do this… but since the detox process is only around 1-2 weeks long depending on hair type, I’m sure I could convince her to let me do it over the summer break! (That, or I could do it behind her back, if she opposes… and if she catches me in the act, then I only have to wait 4 more years! Lolz!)

    • admin says:

      Re: How Long?

      It’s true: everyone is different. It depends widely based on your hair health, condition, type, and your shampoo/conditioner use (even the brand) beforehand.
      I was a heavy shampoo/conditioner user, daily, with deep conditioning shampoos and I have pretty thick, processed and straight hair… my detox period took around 1.5 weeks, maybe a touch more. Nothing memorable. 🙂

  • hyrkanian says:

    Hi there, I found this post from a link in last night and have spent several hours reading it and every comment. 🙂 Thank you for all the work you did with the original post and patiently answering every question.

    I did my first BS wash/ACV rinse this morning and I’m blown away by how much better my hair is after just one time. I have classic length hair, which is to say down to the tops of my thighs, but it’s had so much abuse from decades of commercial shampoos and conditioners that the last 18 inches or so are split, dry, and really generally unhappy. I switched from Paul Mitchell products (expensive stuff!) to Jason Organics products to avoid the SLS, which helped some. Then I started using Leggett’s shampoo bar and/or Burt’s Bees Rosemary and Mint shampoo bar, and noticed with those I didn’t even need conditioner since they didn’t strip my hair at all. I’ve also been stretching out the time between shampooing until I made it to 15 days between, by braiding the last few days, etc. It’s winter, I work from home, and can deal with greasy for the end result. I’m hoping for less detox time since I haven’t used even the shampoo bars more than 4 times in the last two months.

    Part of the reason I worked up to this length of time between washings was because combing, brushing, shampooing, conditioning, rinsing, and air-drying my hair was an all-morning affair. Even then it was still damp until early evening. Today I was amazed to find that after BS/ACV my hair was completely air-dry in less than two hours! All that buildup on my hair was holding in water, which I’m sure made the split ends even worse since wet hair is more delicate than dry hair.

    Add to all the nice things everyone’s mentioned gaining from this method the fact that my husband and I are both chemical sensitive, so no headache-inducing perfumy fragrance in our hair is a huge improvement. He did BS/ACV on his hair this morning as well and I think he’s happy with it. His hair is baby-fine, medium curly, and a little past shoulder blade length.

    I used ACV rinse on my hair as a kid and up through teenage years, my grandmother insisted it was better than “all that store bought stuff.” I used it after shampoo and conditioner then, though. ACV for red hair, lemon juice diluted rinse for blonde hair, and either walnut bark tea or chamomile tea for brunette, was what she told me.

    So, thanks again for all the work you’ve done with this post. From your replies to comments it sounds like we have a fair bit in common so I’d like to add you to friends if you don’t mind. 🙂

  • Anonymous says:

    Oily Hair

    Hi Babyslime – I have to wash my hair daily or I lok like a greeseball, sorry TMI. My hair is very straight, thick but fine. I do have build-up and cannot find a reasonable priced shampoo to help. Also, during the winter my scalp is very dry. My hair is short but I plan on growing it out to about my shoulders by the end of summer. How much do you suggest I use? Also, I guess I am confused, do I use both the BS and ACV during each wash? Like the BS as a shampoo and the AVC as a conditioner?

  • aliastaken says:

    Chlorine

    My daughter is on a swim team and the chlorine in the pool makes her scalp very, very dry. Special chlorine removing shampoos didn’t help. She washes twice a week with a dandruff shampoo. I’m curious if this could be an alternative.

    • admin says:

      Re: Chlorine

      It’s definitely worth a try. 🙂
      If you know her scalp is prone to being very dry, you can try leaving the ACV mix on for a little bit, or upping the amount of ACV in dilution to 1.5tbs to see if that helps her.

  • Anonymous says:

    WOW

    this is really cool and im really considering it! are you still able to use hair straightners?

  • Anonymous says:

    Hi!

    Thank you for the great information!
    I just did my first no poo wash.

    I made a mixture of 1 tbs BS/ 250 mls water and then the 1tbs AVS/ 250mls water. My hair is half way down my back. Not thin but not very thick either.

    I used up both mixtures. Can it be bad for my hair since I noticed that you yourself wrote that you only need a little amount (I understand that you have much shorter hair =) ?
    How to know which amount is enough without overusing ’cause as stated, it doesn’t later like shampoo?

    Also with the AVS rinse. Should you first rinse it of with warm water and then cold or only cold water?

    My hair feels kind of okay right now, though maybe a bit dry (it hasn’t dried out completely yet). Also is there any way of making your hair dry faster , is the blow dryers cool air function also bad? I don’t like the feeling of damp hair and it’s winter and cold here so I’ve sometimes gotten a cold when letting my hair dry by itself, indoors that is =)

    Thank you for helping!!

    • admin says:

      The dilution remains the same regardless of how much of that 1 cup of mixture you use, so use as much as you need to cover your hair or scalp. 🙂

      With the rinse, ideal results come from rinsing with cooler water (I use just less than lukewarm, but not enough to be uncomfortable) but sometimes if I’m in a hurry I just use the warm water. It’s not like it’ll hurt you or anything.

  • bs

    Ever since I saw this, I’ve been wanting to give the no poo thing a go, since I only wash my hair a few times a week anyway.

    Yesterday, I tried rinsing my hair with the BS, but, since I wanted to be cautious about the whole soft-water issue, I boiled some water to use. Well, it was way to hot even after I let it sit for about ten minutes (and I know that generally that is not enough time to let boiling water cool, but I was anxious to try it out). So when I poured it over my hair, I’m pretty sure it was more the boiling water that burned my scalp than the BS. However, I didn’t lather it, and I rinsed it out right away. I didn’t see any difference after using it, since I’m sure what I did wasn’t the proper way to go about it.

    My question is, since my hair is incredibly greasy (and I’m used to this, so I don’t particularly mind), do you think it’d be wise to give it another go since I tried it yesterday, even though what I did wasn’t the proper way, so it technically didn ‘t work? Or should I just wait another day or two to try it again, just incase?

  • Anonymous says:

    allergies

    My biggest concern is how to remove pollen from the hair. One of my little ones really has trouble with her eyes at certain times of the year if she doesn’t wash her hair after playing outside. Also…any tips on getting bonfire odor out of hair without washing???

    • admin says:

      Re: allergies

      I have severe environmental allergies and have never noticed that simple washing/massage with plain water fails to remove pollen or bonfire smell. 🙂

      For just removing odours without using water… perhaps make a spritz of water, witchhazel and tea tree oil? I often use that on my clothing.

  • Could this also be safe to use on a baby? I’m looking for a healthier and natural alternative to the typical Johnson and Johnson and other mainstream brands that are out there.

    • admin says:

      Yes! I use it on both my kids, starting in infancy when they were old enough to need their hair washed with something other than warm water (which wasn’t until they were probably close to one, or older). 🙂

  • moistangel says:

    I realize this is a very ancient post but I’m at my wits end with my hair and from being someone who reads your journal faithfully (heh) I respect you, and recommends this too, so I’m plunging in!

    I just wanted to thank you for taking the time to write something so well and thoughtfully. Thank you! 🙂

  • Anonymous says:

    Hair Gels – Aloe Vera

    Oh I’ve been doing this for almost a year and it’s been great! Although I switched to hard water (moved) and been having more difficulty with tangles and dry hair, split ends and my hair feeling yucky. I do the Olive Oil thing whenever I feel like it (every other month – I probably ought to do it more). My hair is waist length and very fine.

    On the hair gel though I wanted to add another – Aloe Vera Gel is wonderful! Especially for curly hair! My husband uses it with his hair too (he also went no ‘poo after feeling how soft my hair is from doing so) He likes how Aloe doesn’t make his hair icky like normal styling gel does. It combs in soft and doesn’t feel like it needs to be washed or is dirty afterwards (and I am more likely to run my fingers through it if it isn’t icky). Very nice alternative to commercial hair gels.

  • zeneschal says:

    I have a question please…do you rinse with the avc while the bs mix is still in your hair or do you wash with bs, rinse with water, then rinse with avc again?

  • I would like to say I am one of those un/fortunate people who has naturally curly hair. My hair is also very fine. I am in the midst of the process you described above, and I thank you for the detailed and accurate information. I thought for years upon years that my hair was just naturally not good-looking. I loved having it long even though it hardly ever looked nice, so I would keep cutting it short. It was frizzy, dull, breaky, bushy, and impossible to manage without a ton of product or a zealously wielded pair of scissors. For the first time since I was a little girl, I have seen my hair SHINE. I am using baking soda and vinegar water, brushing 100 times a day, and washing every 2-3 days, never getting it wet unless I’m washing it (or having a swim). I think the brushing is extremely important, and is part of what I missed out on prior attempts to fix my hair. I think anyone who has “problem hair” should try this, give it at least a month to change the hair’s ecosystem, and they are likely to find that the shampoo was the problem instead. Thank you again for your help in putting this information out there!

  • **smile**

    this is my first time hearing about no poo!!!
    You did a really good job in summing it up…
    thanks a lot.

  • Anonymous says:

    Do you always wash your hair with water when you aren’t washing it with baking soda? Do you need to wash it with water..? Because I prefer to not wash it with water on a non BS day. Do you blow dry your hair as well? Would it make it worst? How many times a week do you do the BS and ACV thing? Can you add those herbs to the ACV or BS?
    Sorry for all the questions.

  • Anonymous says:

    Do you always wash your hair with water when you aren’t washing it with baking soda? Do you need to wash it with water..? Because I prefer to not wash it with water on a non BS day. Do you blow dry your hair as well? Would it make it worst? How many times a week do you do the BS and ACV thing? Can you add those herbs to the ACV or BS?
    Sorry for all the questions.

    • admin says:

      I do wash it with water on my off days. 🙂
      You don’t need to, I guess – I just kind of rub my fingers around my scalp and make sure the water gets right in. It’s just part of my shower routine to get anything off me!

      I don’t blow dry my hair, no – I prefer to let it dry naturally but that’s just my personal preference. Blow drying is always a damaging activity no matter what your hair care routine is, but people who do it regularly mind find some success by blow drying it *almost* all the way and letting the last bit of the ends dry naturally, then brush a touch of coconut oil into it to keep the moisture.

      I personally do the BS/ACV routine about once a week, twice if needed. I don’t really have a set schedule, I just go by the feel of my hair.
      You can add the herbs to the ACV mix – they work a little more nicely that way. 🙂

    • admin says:

      I do wash it with water on my off days. 🙂
      You don’t need to, I guess – I just kind of rub my fingers around my scalp and make sure the water gets right in. It’s just part of my shower routine to get anything off me!

      I don’t blow dry my hair, no – I prefer to let it dry naturally but that’s just my personal preference. Blow drying is always a damaging activity no matter what your hair care routine is, but people who do it regularly mind find some success by blow drying it *almost* all the way and letting the last bit of the ends dry naturally, then brush a touch of coconut oil into it to keep the moisture.

      I personally do the BS/ACV routine about once a week, twice if needed. I don’t really have a set schedule, I just go by the feel of my hair.
      You can add the herbs to the ACV mix – they work a little more nicely that way. 🙂

  • Anonymous says:

    What about work-outs?

    I’ve been considering going no-poo, and was just wondering – I work out at least 3 times a week – what do I do when my hair gets all sweaty and gross? Just water wash?

    • admin says:

      Re: What about work-outs?

      When I get like this I find a hot water rub/massage into my hair (is if you’re washing) works really well, then I wash once a week (twice if it’s absolutely needed). Some people find success with doing the BS/ACV wash 3x a week, but a few others have reported a slight lightening to their hair if they do it 3-5x a week (ODing on baking soda can affect your hair’s colour, but it’s pretty mild).

  • Anonymous says:

    super greasy hair

    I did this for about 2 months. At first the oil build up was nice b/c my hair styled better. But after a while it got so thick that my head was like a helmit and so much oil that my hair wouldn’t be dry after 12 hours. Also, it would be oily the first few inches near my scalp, especially in the back, the bottom half and ends of my hair were fine. I finally broke down and used some real shampoo– which of course took away all my natural oils and now I’m frizzy and hair doesn’t stay styled as well. But I really want to stick with no poo — so what is some advice for this? I also do not wash my toddlers hair, and in fact seldom even use the baking soda or anything more than just water. Her hair does not look greasy at all — although her hair was never hooked on shampoo in the first place.

    • admin says:

      Re: super greasy hair

      Try working the BS mixture (add a little to it, make it a little more like 1.5-2 tbp per cup of warm water) very close to your scalp, all over. Give it a big massage.
      Then rinse.
      Then only pour the ACV on the ends of your hair and gently work it there, don’t work it into your scalp. Then rinse with cooler water. Try that 2-3x a week for about 2-3 weeks and see if you get a difference after the detox period. 🙂

  • asunlitrose says:

    Thanks for writing all of this up! It’s great, and I’m trying BS and ACV at the moment.

    Question —

    The section on dandruff says, “To help control dandruff you can use a mild acidic solution on your scalp, before shampooing, about twice a week.” Does this mean before I would BS? Should I still use ACV after BS? I’m confused!

    Also, about the brown sugar. Should I just put a few pinches on my scalp and massage in?

    • admin says:

      That means separately from your BS/ACV wash. 🙂 It doesn’t matter if you do it before or after, but I’d probably do it before just the same.

      re: sugar – yup! Try it! If that doesn’t work for you, experiment.

      • asunlitrose says:

        Thanks for getting back to me so quickly! The people over at must be busy tonight. 🙂

        One last question — I have fine and curly hair and was trying to use coconut oil to tame my frizzies, and it wasn’t working quite well. I bought some jojoba oil today to try instead. Will it work better if I put it on my hair wet?

        Oh, and I don’t know if anyone else has mentioned this to you, but my hair looks 10x better if I wash it right before sleeping! I don’t know why, but it makes my hair look fab the next morning.

        • admin says:

          I have heard it’s best to use the oil on wet hair, yes. 🙂 You might want to search some African American hair care forums for answers on this, too. 🙂

          I can never do mine just before bed, because if it dries as I sleep on it, it gets all funky! But I have straight hair, too.

  • lady_isz says:

    No-Poo 😀

    Good afternoon. 🙂

    I stumbled on this post last week while looking up different shampoo alternatives. I wanted something I didn’t have to go through a whole lot of effort to make/use.

    I have had EXTREMELY oily hair since I was 11 years old (I’m 33 now). It’s so bad that if I go more than 24 hours without washing, it looks like it’s been combed through with vegetable oil! It’s also very light blonde and thin/fine.

    Anyway, I decided to give your method a shot. Last Thursday (the day I read your post haha) I got home from work and tried it out. I hadn’t washed my hair that morning so it was already pretty oily anyway. I brushed it first with my (cruelty-free from Morroccan Method <3) boar bristle brush to distribute the oils all through my hair. I mixed the baking soda/water and the ACV/water and put them in the pointy-tipped squirty type bottles that are used for ketchup/mustard/salad dressing and squirted the mixtures all into my hair and scalp. I also used a wide-tooth comb to get the baking soda and ACV through all of my hair. After using it I let my hair dry naturally and seriously... I LOVED the results! It was soft, easy to comb, light, fluffy, NOT oily at ALL but at the same time it wasn't anywhere close to seeming dried out. Also, I loved the way my hair smelled! It really didn't smell like much - just nice clean hair but very nice. My boyfriend liked the way it smelled too. I haven't used shampoo or conditioner since.

    I can’t even remember the last time I used LiveJournal, but I just had to log in here and thank you for taking the time to post all of that information. I’ve sent a few of my friends to your page too, so they can try it. 🙂

    Now… any ideas on a body soap that’s this easy???? 😉

    • admin says:

      Re: No-Poo 😀

      That’s great! I’m glad to hear that. 🙂
      I’ve been shampoo free now since this post (just under four years!) and I LOVE my hair. So much. After I wash it I can’t help but touch it all day long. I touch it so much I probably help get it “dirtier” (greasy) faster just from my hand oils. Hehe.

      No advice on a body bar, unfortunately! We use OCM on our faces (oil cleansing method) and I generally don’t really use a body bar. Just a gentle scrub with hot water usually does the trick. For something stubborn I use olive oil soap or milk soap.

      • lady_isz says:

        Re: No-Poo 😀

        Cool! And I understand about the playing with it. haha. I keep playing with mine and had the same thoughts on making it “dirty” faster. :p But I figure even if I have to do the BS/ACV once a day – it’s still better than the shampoo. 🙂

        I’ve been just using commercially prepared body and face washes, and I may as well use them up before going “no-soap” 😉 Thanks again!! Take care.

  • Anonymous says:

    HELP

    I really want this to work. My hair is thin (like, stylists ask me how it’s possible to have “baby” hair at 29 years old), and it’s really looking terribly greasy! I’m pretty easy-going, but I’m sooo embarresed by the state of my hair!
    It’s been three days, the first day it looked great, but the last two have been a mess. Should I use the baking soda every day, or will that make it worse?
    mianna

  • Anonymous says:

    Thank you for posting this wonderful burst of knowledge

    I first heard about this from the AngryChicken blog when she mentioned she had been two months poo-free. I saw that and thought, what the heck is that. When I came to this link to read all about it I got really jezzed to try it. I have to say, my first try has been a disaster. I have never had my hair so greasy in my life. It really grossed me out until today, almost a week after starting, I caved and shampooed my hair. Guilty, I know. So I thought I would come back here, read all your wonderful advice and see if I couldn’t re-inspire myself.

    Well, as it turns out I must not have read it so well the first time, I was using the WHOLE baking soda and ACV solution on my hair, EVERYDAY when I would shower in the morning. I was also adding oils and extracts left right and centre to try and get over the smell. I did notice my hair lightening a little too. So I think I’m going to try it again,with just a little lavender and rosemary for the smell and to try and re-darken my hair. And this time I’m going to try only once everything three days or so to start off with.
    So Thanks again for this incredibly helpful source of information and hopefull I can get this to work for me. I really and rootin’ for it.

    Music

  • hkneale says:

    Yay for no shampoo!!

    I’ve been shampoo-free for two years, and can’t imagine ever going back to the horrid stuff.

    The two things my curly locks have noticed about being shampoo-free is that they are more manageable, and I never EVER get split ends.

  • After all these years, I’m finally giving up on shampoo – and I remembered that this was where to look for info on doing so. Thank you again…

  • Anonymous says:

    How does ACV effect grey hair?

    I am salt-n-pepper with more on the “salt” side and I wondered if the ACV would have a “yellowing” effect on grey hair. Right now I use a shampoo specifically for grey hair. I notice my ends dry out (forcing me to use conditioner), but above my ears and at my hairline gets oily within 10 to 12 hours of washing.

    I don’t use any other hair products.

    • admin says:

      Re: How does ACV effect grey hair?

      I have some “salt” and have not noticed any yellowing, nor has anyone else I know who has “salted” or “mostly salt” hair. 😉

  • squeakysoul says:

    Fragrance

    I’ve been trying the no-poo method and I must say, I love what it’s doing for my hair. It’s still in the detox stage and therefore still a bit greasy, but for once the waves on the back of my head aren’t flattening out, and there is so much less frizz in my hair! Which, believe me, is totally unheard of for me. Now I can’t wait for my hair to grow long again, so I can see what this looks like on my usual long hair! lol.

    I do have one question, if you don’t mind my asking – amazing how you are getting questions on this post FOUR years later! A testament to the quality of this post. The question is as follows: although shampoo stripped my hair, and conditioner weighed it down and made it feel greasy if I used too much (or washed with it) – the thing I miss the most about those products is how absolutely wonderful they would smell in my hair. When my hair was long, though it was frizzy I was proud of how it would remain fragrant for days, I would sometimes get complimented on it. I also liked smelling it myself. But now, my hair doesn’t smell like anything. So my question is: what do you use, what do you suggest, to put fragrance in my hair again? Any essential oil mixes that work well for you? When and how do you apply them? You suggest any herbal infusions? How long does the fragrance last? Thanks a million for answering, it’s much appreciated.

    • squeakysoul says:

      Re: Fragrance

      Addendum: when you do deep conditioning treatments, do you use the baking soda/vinegar combo to wash them off, or do you simply rinse it out in water? Thanks! 🙂

      • admin says:

        Re: Fragrance

        Wash each out separately with water. 🙂 Normal water for the BS wash, but cool water works better for the ACV for reasons mentioned in the post.

        As for fragrance… lots of people do a tea infusion with oils as a rinse INSTEAD of ACV. But I prefer to just make up a spritzer bottle of water with a few dribbles of my favourite oils, put it in a 30 cent spray bottle from the pharmacy and spritz it on my hair as it dries. 🙂

        • squeakysoul says:

          Re: Fragrance

          Thank you for the quick response! So deep conditioning treatments get rinsed out with only water? lol that must be a bit slippery! But in the name of treating my hair right I’ll try it. I’m looking forward to trying the thing with the fragrance oils. 🙂

  • Anonymous says:

    This is wonderful!

    This is the best blog ever! I can’t wait to try these helpful tips. I will be adding you to my rss feeds! Thank you for this wonderful information.

    • admin says:

      Re: This is wonderful!

      Thank you! But this is actually just one random post on a personal blog, I am not a natural living zine. 🙂 So you may find yourself disappointed. 😉

  • Anonymous says:

    This is wonderful!

    This is the best blog ever! I can’t wait to try these helpful tips. I will be adding you to my rss feeds! Thank you for this wonderful information.

  • rojomiamor says:

    good post. im going to memory it.

    but. unrelated to that. i friended you, because, i think i could enjoy you as an lj friend.

  • WOW!
    I was referred here by darlingmiette and I’m just going WOW over this all.

  • admin says:

    You can use no poo on them if you like – I use it on my kids.
    The measurements are the same. 🙂

  • Anonymous says:

    Info: Shampoo Free

    Reasons why shampoo and soap for hair much too long. No wonder it took all day to write and half the day to read. Could have been synopsized to just elaborate on what to do to provide healthy hair, instead of all the negatives under the sun about why conventional treatment/cleaning of hair is unhealthy.

    • Anonymous says:

      Re: Info: Shampoo Free

      I really enjoyed the background information about the negative side to shampoo – thanks so much for all your work collaborating that information! I have been no-poo for 6 weeks, and my hair is slowly improving as I learn what works and what doesn’t and adjust my routine. I have a finicky scalp and have found that rubbing a little bit of urine (yep, I said urine) into my scalp before rinsing with ACV works WONDERS. I am generally very well hydrated, so my urine is pretty dilute and hardly smells – and once it’s rinsed out, there isn’t even a hint of urine-smell. I have been reading about urine therapy and decided that would be my introduction to experimenting – and what do you know?

  • darzinger says:

    Hi,
    Firstly, thank you for this post. I have been poo free for about a month. I have been doing 1tsp/1c of BS as well as ACV.

    – After applying BS, do I rinse with water and then apply ACV or do I just rinse the BS out with the ACV

    – Why do you suggest not doing the ACV rinse everytime?

    – I found some lightened hairs. Do you know if it will continue to lighten making my hair white?

    Thanks for your time and help!

    • admin says:

      It’s one tablespoon, not one teaspoon. 🙂

      Yes, rinse with water first.
      I suggest trying things out to see what your hair needs! There’s no science behind it other than that.
      No it won’t make your hair white. It is unlikely the BS is lightening your hair much at all. It’s also coming into summer. 🙂

      • darzinger says:

        Oops sorry. I did mean tablespoon.

        Actually, my hair is dark dark brown (I’m asian) and I found some tips to be light orange which I’ve never had before so I’m pretty sure it’s either the BS or ACV. Its kind of nice actually.. just don’t want to have a head of white hair at the age of 26! =P

  • moopeahen says:

    Going no shampoo

    Thanks so much for this comprehensive explanation. I have been going no poo for two weeks now. I am really pleased with the results so far and look forward to getting my real hair back! I have noticed already after one baking soda wash that my hair doesn’t need blowdrying to style. I have never been a high maintenance girl and hated being told by hairdressers that it is essential to blowdry and use products to have any sort of interesting hairstyle. Well now I have proved them wrong!

  • Anonymous says:

    Help!

    Ok, so I’ve been “poo-free” now for 2 months…I really really love the idea of not using all that chemical-laden shampoo and conditioner crap, but oh how I miss my old hair! I no longer have any shine at all, my roots feel oily (but it’s not really noticeable greasiness) and my ends are dry and unmanageable…I no longer get any soft nice movement and my hair just looks dull. I started out using 1 tbs baking powder to 1 cup water and 2 tbs apple cider vinegar to 2 cups water but my hair was so greasy I cut the vinegar in half and now only use 1 tbs per 2 cups water (baking soda cleanse is still the same). I don’t know what else to try…i’m scared if I make and use a deep conditioner for my ends, my roots will be greasy, and I can’t cut down on the vinegar any more! And I still have to wash my hair every other day…I’ve tried leaving it longer and only washed it about twice a week for the first while but it was so awful. Oh, and I have shoulder length hair…I tried doubling the baking soda recipe but it was too drying, so I went back to the original. I really don’t want to give up on the “no-poo” lifestyle, but I need some help!
    Oh, and since this post is so old, have you coloured your hair yet? I’m dying to colour mine but the baking soda will just lighten it…it’s already lightened mine quite a bit!
    Thanks so much 🙂 🙂

    • admin says:

      Re: Help!

      I have coloured my hair, multiple times and found no difference. 🙂

      As for your other question: a good tip I was referred to was to only use the BS on the top of your head, but don’t rub it *into* your scalp (in other words, try to just keep it around the base of your hair). Then use the ACV on the surface, concentrating on the tips.

      If that doesn’t help, I’d strongly suggest checking out the no_poo community!!

  • Anonymous says:

    I was wondering….you see, I have what they think to be psoriasis, and I thought that maybe this might help? I’m getting sick of these chemicals they’re giving me that damage my hair and just make my scalp more aggravated. :/

  • Anonymous says:

    I have a question.. I beat a regular egg instead of using baking soda, and it works wonders. My hair always comes out perfectly clean, however, I was wondering, is it particularily damaging like baking soda can be? And will it strip color the same way, or is it prefectly fine to keep going the way I’m going? I have yet to use baking soda and vinegar since one egg works so well for me. I have long hair that is very fine, but thick in terms of quantity, and I have had to wash my hair daily for all my life since I was always under the impression that I had such an “oily” scalp, whick of course just made my ends dry! But I’ve been doing this for a few weeks and now I’m down to once every three or so days with an egg. I love my egg! 😀

    • admin says:

      If it’s working for your hair, keep doing it. 🙂 It doesn’t have the same properties of baking soda so I highly doubt it has the same effects that BS does when used in excess.

  • Anonymous says:

    I tried this formula, & found that it leaves a heavy film on my hair brush when I pass my clean paddle brush through my cleaned dry hair, as though I have not washed my hair or brush in a while. Someone told me that the ACV rinse can stimulate sebum production, & to just apply it to the ends of your hair. I have been washing my hair about 1 or 2 times per week using the baking soda ACV formula. Are you supposed to use the ACV rinse on just the ends of your hair? if so how is one supposed to restore ph balance to their scalps/tops of their heads without stimulating excessive sebum production? will diluted lemon juice work in place of ACV? is it too drying?

    should I apply a hair oil to the ends of my hair after each 1 or 2 times a week washing? do hair oils build up in the hair? right now I do not have hot water, only cold, my water heater broke, my tap water is also hard. Is the combination of baking soda & hard tap/shower water too alkaline for my hair? Is there a non greasy rinse I can use on all my hair & scalp to restore the ph? It is winiter here in Southern California, where I am, & it gets dry.

    how often if at all should I apply hair oils?

    • admin says:

      Unfortunately I’m not a health expert or a chemist so I don’t know the detailed answers to the questions you’re asking. 🙂 When I wash I scrub the baking soda into my scalp and apply it pretty closely, but when I rinse with ACV I kind of pour it all over and work it through my hair. Grease and that ‘dirty’ feeling generally stays pretty close to the top of your head, and the ends tend to dry out.

      Some communities like the ones listed here might be a much better place to ask your questions: specifically the community, which has a number of long-time users who have a vast collective knowledge base.

  • atdelphi says:

    Thank you so much for putting this helpful guide together. 🙂 I have oddly-textured hair and keeping it smooth and healthy-looking was always a battle (and expensive!) It’s been several months since I started using the baking soda and ACV, and I’ve been lucky enough to have no unpleasant transition period – just straight to soft, shiny hair that can finally be tamed with nothing more than a brush. It’s especially fabulous because I spend half my time in a very dry climate and the other half in humidity, and dealing with it now is simply a matter of adjusting my solutions. Thanks again!

  • lilyumestar says:

    Bad lucK?

    Hello! I’ve been no poo for almost half a year and I still seem to be having problems. I’m not exactly sure if I’m doing it correctly but apparently I have never gotten over the detox stage. I have not been using shampoo and I have been using the baking soda mixture along with occasional herbal tea rinses. I use 3/4 tsp baking soda to one cup of water and 1 herbal tea bag to 2 cups of hot water and I let it soak until the water cools before I use it.

    I would use the baking soda mixture every 1-2 a week and I use the herbal tea rinse less often but, I have been rinsing my hair with warm water everyday. Could that be contributing to the greasiness? A day or two after I use the baking soda mixture, my hair would start to get greasy again. I would like to use the baking soda mixture more often but my hair is dry. I would like to use the herbal tea rinse or apple cider rinse more often but my scalp and top of my hair is too greasy. I combination hair and it’s making it really difficult.

    Do you know any remedy to solve this problem? I have been getting awful comments about my hair being either too dry or too greasy.

  • helvikene says:

    I saw this on another lj and decided I would try it since I hate having to wash my hair every other day or so.

    I want to start this tomorrow but I’m used to washing my hair almost every day. Should I do this mix every other day to start it off?
    And if my hair looks really greasy one day and I want to wash it is there a certain shampoo that I should use?

  • Anonymous says:

    new to no-poo

    I’m very new to this – thank you for this very informative article! It helped me out alot. I’ve already made up a mix of making soda and water in one bottle (although I’ll just have to use tiny bits because right now, its more of a thin paste) and ACV in the other.
    I’m already experiencing the “detox” greasy reaction but hoping that will go away soon. In the meantime, I’m just wearing a mennonite/amish style headcovering over it! my ultimate goal is to just get it healthy again and keep it from falling out so much!
    Thanks again!

  • Cool, thanks!

    I thought people only made those volcano project on (pre-)teen sitcoms. *g*

  • Anonymous says:

    is straightening or blow drying allowed?
    or is that just a big no-no?

  • Coconut Oil

    Hi. I’m not sure if you have much experience with my specific problem. But I thought I’d ask because you might have an answer. I’ve used the baking soda/acv for the past 2 washes. (I’ve done it before, but it’s been over 6 months and this time, I really want to stay away from shampoo long term.) I wash 1-2x/week. I have long, thick, curly, very frizzy hair. (Think afro texture with a tendency to go limp.) So, I use coconut oil especially on the ends as a styling product. On my first wash (with bs/acv) I think I may have accidentally over-done the coconut oil. A couple days later, I washed again. The coconut oil still feels like it’s there. How can I get it out without going back to shampoo? Thanks in advance!

  • hockeycat says:

    What do you recommend for an athlete who wants to try this (and is also growing out her hair)? I play ice hockey (I’m a goaltender), so there’s no way I can get away with not washing my hair after a game (no matter how I clean my equipment, it still has that… distinctive… odor…) I’ve been trying the not ‘pooing every day for a month or so (just conditioner every other day), but still have dry & frizzy issues.

    Thanks!

  • kiri_l says:

    Thank you for taking the time to post this. =)

  • marzquinn says:

    5 years without ‘poo

    I have curly hair and I found that the longer I went with out shampooing my hair the better it looked. Then someone turned my onto a book called “Curly Girl” which talks about the benefits of living without shampoo. I love it and my hair has never been happier.

  • I personally find it easiest to make a liquidy paste in the palm of my hand with about half a tablespoon, and then sprinkle and massage into dripping wet hair.

    Just want to make sure I got this right–so that’s about half a teaspoon per use? And you do that about twice a week?

  • Hello

    Pursuer down there linked to this post in a forum we both frequent, and it deffinately sounds like it’s at least worth a shot. (Probably more than that but we’ll see how it goes once I’ve tried it!) I don’t know whether I’ll be able to get all the ingredients, especially the apple cider vinegar, and the white vinegar for the dandruff rinse, but I will ask the people I think are likely to know and see what they can come up with. If I manage to procure some I will give it a fair try for about a month like others have suggested, and let you know how I get on. In the mean time, thank you for writing this post (Jess, thanks for linking to it) and I will book mark it for future reference 🙂

    Katie

  • pursuer says:

    WOW! I am so glad I saw the link to here on Clothesline Alley. This is awesome! Thanks for sharing the info with so many people! 🙂

  • I just found this post recently and have been washing my hair using baking soda for about two weeks now. I like it a lot. I used to have this spot on the right side of my head that just always seemed greasy, like I’d not rinsed out the shampoo properly, which is all soft and shiny now along with the rest of my hair.
    My hands feel nice and smooth afterwards as well.

    Are you supposed to use a full cup of water per wash? So far I’ve used maybe half a cup (on fairly thick armpit-length hair) and it worked just fine, but rereading the instructions before making yesterday’s batch (teaspoon or tablespoon? Tablespoon!) made me think you probably meant use a cup of water per wash.

    Is it supposed to foam? If I use enough of the liquid things get somewhat foamy. Nowhere near as much as a good bit of shampoo will do, but it still seems odd. Is it part of the baking soda, or is it bits of shampoo left there after years of using that stuff?

    • admin says:

      It’s the dilution of the liquid, not the amount that does it so use as much or as little as you need so long as the dilution is kept the same.
      As for the foaming: mine just recently started foaming a few months ago when I used it on my hair and then stopped again. I have always used the same container, I haven’t used shampoo for almost 3 years and nothing has changed so I really have no idea why that happens!

      • Thanks for the answers. If it’s just the dilution, it’s easy to just make a batch that fits in whatever container I have handy.

        mine just recently started foaming a few months ago when I used it on my hair and then stopped again.
        I shan’t worry about the foaming, then. 🙂

        • Anonymous says:

          Foaming may be natural

          Hi,

          If the water is soft, it may kind of foam a little just by itself. I think this might be the explanation.

          I also had some confusion about the amounts in the beginning. Namely, in the old recipes here you can find coffee cups used for measuring, and that is about 1,5 dl. (Nowadays we only use the metric system.) I didn’t think of you cups being a different thing, so I ended up having problems when trying to comb my hair… Last time I realised the measure you mean is mot probably around 2,5 dl. Indeed, the dilution matters.

          Amyway, thanks for your blog. I immediately became hooked with no-poo.

  • Hello there! You are just all over the internet with great advice aren’t you? I found your articles about cloth when I made the switch fro myself and my son, and I have seen other writings of yours linked all over the place.

    I have some questions…

    Do you use the whole cup at a time?

    Also, I bleach the front half of my hair (see icon, and the many pics I’ve posted in the baby community) and have no intention of stopping that any time soon. Will the BS/ACV mess with the bleach? (If you know.)

    Thanks so much! 🙂

  • some thoughts

    Probably no one will ever read this, but here are my two cents..

    For $5 you can purchase enough baking soda and apple cider vinegar to take care of your hair for months, whereas $5 could barely buy you one bottle of commercial shampoo!

    This is blatantly false. CVS sells fair-sized bottles of shampoo for less than a dollar (77-99 cents).

    I found your suggested method completely ineffective for washing my hair. I tried it for a month, and my hair was terribly greasy. I was physically uncomfortable. It wasn’t until I made a paste (typically with more than one tablespoon of baking soda) that I got any relief.

    Also, your own links cast doubt on your claims about the hazards of sodium lauryl sulfate n shampoo and beauty products. See here (Snopes) and here (Dr. Weil).

    The FDA regulates and approves the combination of ingredients in shampoo. However, I doubt they have done testing on the use of baking soda consistently over time as a shampoo, or its possible effects on your skin in this process. For someone who is so concerned about the health effects of what they are slathering on their body, you seem pretty quick to accept both baking soda and apple cider vinegar as perfectly safe, cooking products which have not been specifically approved for use on hair.

    Just because something is a “natural” product does not mean it is safe or good for us. It’s possible that shampoo is unhealthy, but it’s just as possible that using baking soda and apple cider vinegar on your hair and scalp is unhealthy, and the latter case has not undergone any rigourous testing at all.

    I like using baking soda paste to clean my hair because I feel it does a better job (i.e., makes my hair drier and less greasy) than shampoo. But for all I know, it is just as bad or worse for my body than using shampoo. I’d be more reassured if there was real evidence that the chemicals you like are any better than the chemicals that the shampoo companies like.

    • andreya says:

      Re: some thoughts

      hmm… good points

      I Googled a bit, & Wikipedia says that it’s also used in cooking etc. & “Sodium bicarbonate is considered to be relatively safe, however consumption of large amounts should be avoided. See MSDS.” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sodium_bicarbonate
      (I know it’s ‘just’ Wikipedia, but still, hm, if it’s okay to eat, wouldn’t it be okay to wash hair with? & remember this has been around much longer than newer chemicals/ingredients)

      Seems some studies HAVE been made, though it seems mostly about ingesting it: see http://toxnet.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/sis/search/r?dbs+hsdb:@term+@rn+144-55-8 I admit I don’t feel much wiser after reading it, but at least it says when NOT to ingest baking soda. Seems it may not be good for pregnant women… (for the foetus) – based on animal studies, but not sure in what form it was given to them; or for people with high blood pressure or bad heart or some other ailments (but again, they are probably talking about ingesting it, dunno)

      Maybe people who have no-pooed for years could volunteer for studies? (maybe blood samples of how much soda is in their system?)

      This is all just very interesting!
      *
      I haven’t tried this method of ‘no-pooing’ yet, though I’m definitely intrigued & may give it a try! (If nothing else, for the fun of experimenting!)

      • admin says:

        Re: some thoughts

        I wonder what the studies would say if people ingested even small amounts of shampoo on a daily basis. 😉

        • andreya says:

          Re: some thoughts

          Yes, I wonder about that too!! 😉

          Imagine eating Head & Shoulders!! Yuck!!! (got it in my eye once & almost died!! uhm, metaphorically)

          I had an idea to Google & find studies about all things in a typical shampoo (& other things), but it would probably take an enormous amount of time (especially as one would have to Google the possible illnesses/side effects too!!)

          Any idea why this is called ‘no pooing’ (basically it’s making a ‘home shampoo’, no?)

          PS Wonderful tutorial!!!

          PPS Is the girl on your avatar you or Amy Jo Johnson (from Felicity?)

  • etelleadit says:

    Thanks for this, been looking for a guide as to how to go no ‘poo for ages! ♥

  • babysprite says:

    Thanks, Babs. I’d quit packaged and bottled shampoo and conditioner a decade or so ago in lieu of varied dilutions of liquid castile soap for cleansing, olive, sesame and essential oils for conditioning. With essentials for conditioning becoming rather pricey these days, I’m looking of other natural hair-care alternatives. Thus, here am I in “no_poo.”

    Thanks again,

    babysprite

    baby sprite

  • alohawolf says:

    Would either Lye Soap, or Ivory Soap work just as well?

  • italyfilez says:

    Adding to memories. This sounds interesting. I use all-organic shampoo and conditioner and only wash my hair once every two weeks or so (the natural oils restore themselves).

  • How often do you wash your hair?

  • this is so great, thank you!

  • eee_eph says:

    Hi, I just found this post today and it’s fantastic. A brilliant write-up of really useful information. I have one question though: I actually enjoy showering every day and washing my hair every day, it’s part of my “getting up” routine. Would your method still be suitable for that? Baking soda every day and vinegar every few days? Or is this based on the assumption that hair is only washed once or twice a week?

    • admin says:

      Some people find that doing it on a daily basis may make their hair lighter, or a little dry. If you enjoy it every day you could try just doing a tea infusion rinse to make it shine. 🙂
      It sounds like more work than it is. Just brew it up as you wander out into the house in the morning so you have it ready in 10 minutes when you take a shower.

      Others find that if they DON’T do it every day their hair rebels. It really depends on what your hair needs, you can adjust it as you see fit.

  • Random new question for an old post here.

    I just started no-pooing yesterday morning, according to these very instructions. It started out great. When I got out of the shower, my hair moved! And it never does that. Anyway, the rest of the day, my hair sort of stiffened up. I’m assuming it’s part of the detox.

    I used both BS/ACV again today because I thought maybe keeping up the everyday washing at first would help my hair transition. It’s greasy, but I’m OK with it, again because of the detox. However, I am experiencing static in my hair. I have long, fine, thin hair and have always struggled with static.

    So, after all that, my question is: is the static normal during detox? Should I be doing something different or adding something in? I hate to bother you, but I haven’t found anything about static anywhere.

  • This post is fantastic, thank you! I’m adding it to my memories.

  • norokrex says:

    i wandered in from a community link, i was wondering i you minded if i book marked/ put this in memories for when my current shampoo/conditioner run out (don’t wanna waste them).

  • cant_wake_up says:

    Hi, I just found this through a post on babycenter. 🙂

    I don’t wash my hair everyday but I have henna’d hair. Will the baking soda really fade it a lot or is it okay?

    Also, why ACV and not whire vinegar?

    Does the vinegar really burn your eyes? I’d like to use it with my son but I’m concerned that it would really burn him if it got in his face. We tend to take showers together so we just use head to toe tear free wash.

    • admin says:

      With any box dye you’re going to have faster fading, a quality (salon) colour will only last 6-8 weeks “nicely”. Excess shampooing or baking soda ‘nopooing’ will make it fade faster, but really you’re not using the BS/ACV mix that often. Most people find 1-2 times a week is sufficient, and that’s not going to make it fade any faster. 🙂

      Re: eyes. Tear-free shampoos aren’t actually tear free, they have chemicals in them that numb the eyes so you just don’t feel the sting/damage. I’ve been no-pooing for years and do this with my 3.5 year old (and will with my son once he gets hair to wash) and have never once had it in my eyes so I don’t have any personal experience there. I only find a bit of sting with the baking soda if I have raw open wounds on my head.
      I believe ACV is used instead of white vinegar because of strength, but I’m not positive, white vinegar is good for an occassional treatment for dandruff though.

  • weezlyhobbit says:

    Just so I know I’m getting this right..

    Make a bottle full of the baking soda/water mixture (keeping with the ratio 1:1)

    you only use one tablespoon and one cup at a time?

    rinse with apple cider vinegar and water mixture every once in a while

    • weezlyhobbit says:

      one more thing, if you make a bottle of it, how do you keep the correct ratio that you need? (one tablespoon, one cup)?

      • admin says:

        You can rinse with the ACV every time if you want, but it isn’t necessary depending on your hair type. 🙂

        When making a bottle I generally just do this: make two cups with the correct ratio and funnel it in. If I need a little more I make a half cup with half a tablespoon (1.5 teaspoons) and go up or down depending on how much is left.
        Sometimes I just eyeball it. I’ll fill it up if it’s “around” two cups and just put “give or take” two tablespoons in.

  • shrimp_86 says:

    hi, i found this post recently and i’ve been looking for something like this for awhile. i hate having to wash my hair every day. not only does it make my hair look bad, but it’s just a pain to have to deal with. i really wanted to thank you for taking the time to write such an informative article on the subject of using baking soda and vinegar only on hair.

    i just have one question…i tried it a couple of times but did not get the slippery feeling you mentioned in some of the comments. am i doing something wrong? i’ve been putting one tablespoon of baking soda in one cup of warm/hot water and applying to my hair. i massage it in for a bit (no slippery feeling), and then rinse out. so far my hair feels good but it’s already greasy (i did this yesterday, along with the ACV rinse). i’m not too worried about that because i know i’m probably going through the “detox”, but what about not getting the slippery feeling? is this bad? am i doing something wrong?

    • admin says:

      Different hair reacts different ways and you may not ever feel a real slippery sensation. I’d wait until you’re finished detoxing and then try adjusting your formula to find what works best for you.
      IE. When I’m pregnant I find that 1.5tbs of baking soda works better for me, and then slightly less than 1 tbl ACV.

  • mtl_mama says:

    I found this a while ago and bookmarked it. I finally tried it today! Thank you so very much! I’m totally in love now!

    If you’re interested, you can read my thoughts about going “no-poo”.

    Thanks again!!!

  • Why the Pregnancy Warnings?

    Hi!
    I realize that this is an old post and I’m not sure if you will get this question, but no harm in trying I guess! I followed your link to the “Pioneer Thinking” page and read some of their natural hair and body recipes. One thing I don’t understand is the pregnancy warnings. There are warnings for recipes containing rosmary, and also for one containing avacado and coconut milk…What about these natural ingredients is a no-no for pregnancy? I tried looking it up but I can’t find any answers. And what about breastfeeding? Also, are the recipes you gave ok for pregnancy and breastfeeding? Thanks for your help…fantastic post!

    • admin says:

      Re: Why the Pregnancy Warnings?

      That’s probably a CYA move (cover your ass). There are a few herbs that can be abortifacients in early pregnancy when eaten in huge amounts, or ones that can (temporarily) affect milk supply either positively or negatively. But again, you have to consume quite a bit of it, probably with specific intent.
      A few drops of oil on your head? Nah. 😉

  • Anonymous says:

    Herbs…

    Hello! I’d love to start trying this method!

    Anyways, I don’t quite understand how the herbs work. Do you just boil the herbs into 1 cup water and use that with the 1T baking soda? ACV mixture? Separate? Also, how much herbs per cup?

    Thanks!

    • admin says:

      Re: Herbs…

      When making a tea infusion it’s really just about eyeballing it. Think about making a cup of tea, except times about six. 🙂
      And yes, you should strain out the herbs first. 🙂

  • sweetanniehi says:

    Thanks for the info. I am making a hat to wear during the detox time. Being a chemist I know how bad many of the chemicals in shampoo are. I was shocked when I saw diethyle ether in it and other toxic chemicals. This is good alternative.

    Just so people know, the baking soda is a base and it will eat your hair if you use too much. Thats why the hair gets brittle when use too much of it. If you put a strand of hair in something basic, it will slowly dissolve.

    The acv is good because its an acid. Acid is used to clean wool products and other protein fibers like hair.

  • ewtikins says:

    I’ve been trying this for a month, washing my hair twice a week at first and once a week after that. It’s been okay for my hair, but I suffer from seborrheic dermatitis on my scalp and that has been rather unbearable.

    I tried this partly because my skin is quite sensitive and most soaps irritate it quite a lot – even water makes me a little itchy. My hair is in pretty bad shape from two years of bleaching (it’s okay, I’ve stopped now) and many years of using coal tar shampoo to control the seborrheic dermatitis – various anti-fungals did not work at all for me, but coal tar gave some relief to my scalp. On the bright side, I’ve never really used a lot of styling products and I can probably count on one hand the number of times in a year I use a blow-dryer, so for bleached and dyed hair it isn’t actually too bad – just prone to drying out.

    I noticed that when the ACV solution contacted my scalp it felt a little better, so I did some reading online and sure enough, apple cider vinegar is recommended for treatment of seborrheic dermatitis. So, I started applying that neat to my scalp – but because I’d been a month without really treating the dermatitis, there was so much built-up sebum and dead skin that it was quite difficult to get the ACV in actual contact with my scalp.

    What I’ve done is this: I made an oily hair goo out of honey, cocoa butter, coconut oil, and olive oil. I added a tiny bit of tea tree oil (I’ve been known to react to it previously so I’m very cautious), a good half teaspoon of lavender oil (it’s meant to help with balancing sebum production), and quite a bit of dried rosemary. The idea is that oil dissolves oil, and by massaging this stuff into my scalp and leaving it for a good long time and then washing it off, I should be able to get rid of most of the scurf.

    I’ve done this now and I have to say my hair feels great. I did have to use castille soap (the least-irritant oil-remover I’ve been able to find – I am switching to oil-cleansing method for cleaning my skin, though) to get it out.

    I’ve also made up some liquid that has aloe vera gel, ACV, some lavender oil and some more rosemary. I plan to apply this to my scalp and then brush it out every day or two as needed, to keep the seborrheic dermatitis under control, and then stick to the baking soda for actually cleaning my hair about once a week.

    I’ll let you know how I get on. I’m really hoping this will work and I won’t have to go back to using expensive, yucky coal tar shampoo that medicates my scalp but irritates my skin.

  • Just a comment on why toddlers don’t get greasy hair. They don’t yet have the hormonal effects that teenagers and older people have that affect skin and hair greasiness. Toddlers not having greasy hair likely has a lot more to do with other things than whether or not they use shampoo. For the majority of people there is a huge change in hair greasiness when they reach puberty and all the other changes related to the hormones.

  • Anonymous says:

    can a person of color use this recipe?

  • if anyone uses the eggs … don’t rinse with hot water
    like my idiot sister did in the 70’s

  • chrisomatic says:

    I found this post via my friend . My boyfriend and I have been trying this out and it totally rocks! Now our shelves are clear of tons of cruddy shampoos and our wallets grow fatter with the lack of spending money on them. Thanks!

  • mama_rana says:

    Thanks for all the great information. I’ve recently started the no-poo transition, and I’m still tweaking, so this will be very helpful. Filed into my Memories!

  • anowyn says:

    Huh. Turns out this was in my memories from last year!

    I was always skeptical about this method, because I saw tons of posts by people saying “Help my hair is too dry/brittle/etc!” and it made me steer away. Also, I was kind of lazy.

    But recently I read about SLS, the fact that it can absorb into ones bloodstream and cause health problems (I thought it was just a detergent, plain and simple) I decided maybe I SHOULD give this a shot.

    I have long hair so I have two giant bottles of the baking soda wash and the ACV rinse there. I THINK it worked. I haven’t dried my hair yet, but it FEELS clean. And it doesn’t smell bad either!!! 🙂 Thanks for posting this great source of information, !

    PS: Can I mix essential oil into my ACV rinse? Or is that best done separately?

  • lomaprieta says:

    Can you tell me how long I should expect my hair to be greasy? I’m on the second day and it’s really grossing me out. Good thing I waited until school holidays!

    Also, I’m a bit confounded that I’m not supposed to wash my hair every day. Will bad things happen if I do?

    Thanks!

  • lomaprieta says:

    Can you tell me how long I should expect my hair to be greasy? I’m on the second day and it’s really grossing me out. Good thing I waited until school holidays!

    Also, I’m a bit confounded that I’m not supposed to wash my hair every day. Will bad things happen if I do?

    Thanks!

    • admin says:

      Not generally, no. 🙂 Some people find that if they overdo it they’ll get build-up or find their hair starts to lighten a little from the baking soda. It really just depends on your hair.

      How long is your hair and were you a heavy duty shampoo/conditioner user before switching? That plays a big role on how long your detox period is. Mine was about three days, but I’ve seen others last as long as two weeks if they have very long, thick hair and were heavy product users.
      Using some cornstarch on your scalp and brushing through to the ends may help absorb some of the oil. Remember that greasy does not equal dirty!! Your hair is used to putting out this much because that’s what was being stripped of it, and it will adapt. 🙂
      Braiding your hair (if it’s longer) can also help hide the detox. If it’s very short you can get away with it a lot easier because short, greasy-looking and sticky hair styles are generally the “in “thing. 😉

      Don’t worry, it won’t last terribly long!
      Also: If you shower daily, make sure you give your scalp and hair a nice long massage under the hot water. Make sure it reaches right down. This can really help.

      • lomaprieta says:

        Wow, two weeks. What’s heavy-duty? I used shampoo and conditioner daily.

        Oh, and another question: will using shampoo once set everything back to the beginning, or can I have a single shampoo if my hair is too oily and I need to look presentable on Monday?

        Thank you so much for the tips, and for writing this in the first place.:)

        • admin says:

          In regards to using shampoo once or twice… that’s really iffy.
          I had a haircut once where I repeatedly asked the woman not to use shampoo on my hair, and then she scrubbed it in anyway! After that I had another 1-2 day detox where my hair felt almost “coated”.
          Then again, I’ve also had a wash with a product like Aveda at a salon and my hair bounced back instantly. I think this depends both on your hair and on the product that you’ve decided to use on it.

          If you are really facing a problem I’d go with a conditioner-only “wash” instead. Use a clarifying conditioner, which isn’t going to strip your hair like shampoo will but may give you that temporary fix if your detox period hasn’t ended and you need to go to an important meeting. 🙂

        • admin says:

          In regards to using shampoo once or twice… that’s really iffy.
          I had a haircut once where I repeatedly asked the woman not to use shampoo on my hair, and then she scrubbed it in anyway! After that I had another 1-2 day detox where my hair felt almost “coated”.
          Then again, I’ve also had a wash with a product like Aveda at a salon and my hair bounced back instantly. I think this depends both on your hair and on the product that you’ve decided to use on it.

          If you are really facing a problem I’d go with a conditioner-only “wash” instead. Use a clarifying conditioner, which isn’t going to strip your hair like shampoo will but may give you that temporary fix if your detox period hasn’t ended and you need to go to an important meeting. 🙂

      • lomaprieta says:

        Wow, two weeks. What’s heavy-duty? I used shampoo and conditioner daily.

        Oh, and another question: will using shampoo once set everything back to the beginning, or can I have a single shampoo if my hair is too oily and I need to look presentable on Monday?

        Thank you so much for the tips, and for writing this in the first place.:)

    • admin says:

      Not generally, no. 🙂 Some people find that if they overdo it they’ll get build-up or find their hair starts to lighten a little from the baking soda. It really just depends on your hair.

      How long is your hair and were you a heavy duty shampoo/conditioner user before switching? That plays a big role on how long your detox period is. Mine was about three days, but I’ve seen others last as long as two weeks if they have very long, thick hair and were heavy product users.
      Using some cornstarch on your scalp and brushing through to the ends may help absorb some of the oil. Remember that greasy does not equal dirty!! Your hair is used to putting out this much because that’s what was being stripped of it, and it will adapt. 🙂
      Braiding your hair (if it’s longer) can also help hide the detox. If it’s very short you can get away with it a lot easier because short, greasy-looking and sticky hair styles are generally the “in “thing. 😉

      Don’t worry, it won’t last terribly long!
      Also: If you shower daily, make sure you give your scalp and hair a nice long massage under the hot water. Make sure it reaches right down. This can really help.

  • ohei says:

    On page 3 you say that there are high-quality, natural brands of conditioners…I would like to know if you could recommend some?

    Thanks!

  • ohei says:

    On page 3 you say that there are high-quality, natural brands of conditioners…I would like to know if you could recommend some?

    Thanks!

  • claudia_yvr says:

    Vegan hair mousse

    I don’t use hair mousse myself, so I haven’t tried this, but it should be easy enough to make a vegan version of the hair mousse using agar agar.

    Thanks again for all the info!

  • wolfteaparty says:

    I tried no-poo last year, then gave up because of buildup I didn’t know how to get rid of.

    Now I’m trying it again. I’m also applying coconut or jojoba oil to the ends of my hair after washing. I have really thick hair. With a typical shampoo/conditioner hair care routine, my hair near the scalp gets really greasy, but the ends get really dry and start crunching and splitting, especially if I use shampoo (which is the main reason I’m trying this). I am really hoping that this will help my hair be healthier and less prone to breakage and split ends.
    But this time, after every wash, my hair feels really sticky and clumpy. I try to rub the baking soda in near the scalp and concentrate the vinegar more at the ends, just like last time. But the whole length of my hair gets sticky/stringy. I don’t really understand why it’s sticky, because hair grease generally isn’t sticky. It looks better as it dries but is still somewhat clumpy and leaves some kind of invisible weird residue on my hands when I touch it. If I go a while without washing it, it starts to get really hard and stiff and clumpy, like a helmet, and slightly greasy-looking.

    I tried asking around in communities about this and not many people seemed to know what the issue might be. So I thought I’d ask you to see what you think. Could it be the fact that I am using jojoba oil (even though I just put a few drops in the ends)? Could it be detox?

    • admin says:

      Hmmm… that is odd!
      My first suggestion would be to add some tea tree oil into your baking soda mix, because this may be some sort of scalp condition. Try that for a week or two and see if it makes a difference.
      Also, could you have hard water? Sometimes adding a little sea salt to the wash can help with that (just a little, not a lot!).

      When you wash with the baking soda, are you doing it until your hair feels slick all the way down to the ends? Make sure it’s getting equal coverage.
      I know that some people who have end problems find success by doing a sort of ‘treatment’ once a week wher they soak their hair and head in a pot of the baking soda mixture (made to the same dilution) get it in real good, and then wrap their hair in a towel and wait 10 or so minutes before washing it out and doing the vinegar rinse or a tea infusion mix.

      • wolfteaparty says:

        I have very hard water, so this time, I tried putting filtered water in the BS/ACV solutions. This was something I didn’t do last time I tried no-poo last year… I just used tap water. My hair didn’t get very sticky last time, but it really did this time. Because my hair got unbearably sticky, I just gave up and shampooed. Then I saw a recent post in about how something similar happened to someone’s hair when they moved from a place with hard water to a place with soft water (it got “gummy” or “tacky” or something like that… my hair felt that way as well.) So I decided to try making the solutions with tap water again. I just washed my hair, and it seems to be pretty clean now. It feels much better than it had felt with the filtered water solutions. So maybe that was part of the problem. If the problem crops up again I may try your suggestions (which are things I haven’t heard before, so that’s a relief).

        I’ve just been washing the area near the scalp with the baking soda, because that is where it gets greasy, while the ends are dry. I’ll try rubbing the slick down to the ends next time to see if that makes a difference…

        Thanks much for your suggestions!

  • carrieislala says:

    hi! i got some questions

    is it possible to use it everyday or on alternate days as i live in singapore and its rather hot and humid here. so i do sweat alot when the sun is up

    and since i have rather dry hair, is the acv rinses more suitable for daily( or alternate days) kind of use??

  • Hair lightening?

    Hi babs, thanks for writing this up! I’ve been no-pooing for a month or two now and have noticed something kind of strange – my dark blonde/light brown hair has become a few shades lighter! I thought it might have been just the result of being in the summer sun, but then I read this post by another user and now I’m getting scared.

    I don’t mind that it has lightened a little bit, but I am concerned that it will keep getting lighter as time goes on and I’ll end up with bleached out frazzled hair and roots! I really don’t want this method to damage my hair, in fact, that’s what I hadn’t wanted to avoid! I’m just really confused and also a little terrified that this is too harsh on my hair since it’s lightening it so much. I really don’t want my hair looking like crap, especially if it gets any lighter.

    I have been washing my hair about every 3rd day (sometimes 4th if I wear a hat on the 4th day), sometimes with water or vinegar rinses in between. I use 1tbsp (sometimes less) of baking soda along with several drops of rosemary EO in about 2 cups (or more) of water to clean and 1tbsp of apple cider vinegar along with several drops of lavender EO in about 2 cups of cool water for the rinse. When I don’t do the ACV rinses after every cleanse my hair gets angry, tangled and dry, and if I don’t do the BS cleanse my hair gets super greasy.

    I’m not sure what I could be doing wrong or what I can do to stop this. I refuse to dye my hair as I have finally grown it back to its natural colour, so I am pretty disappointed that my hair is slowly being stripped by this method and I’m not sure why. Will my hair keep getting lighter? Is this damaging my hair? Will I start getting ‘roots’ showing? Please help!

    • admin says:

      Re: Hair lightening?

      On occassion some people experience a slight lightening with baking soda, but do not fret! It is not harsh like chemical bleaches and lighteners and will NOT leave your hair blonde, frazzled or processed-looking. It is not nearly that intense. 🙂
      Think of it this way: baking soda can help remove a stain or brighten clothes in your wash, but can’t turn a blue shirt white!

      You also may find your hair reacts a little better (and you can go longer than 3 days) if you use the 1tblsp baking soda with the few drops of rosemary in one cup of hot water instead of two.

      • Re: Hair lightening?

        Thanks! Alright, so it probably won’t get any more light then, right? I really, really hope not. I can deal with what it’s done so far (it just looks like natural highlights from the sun), but I was just worried that it would keep getting lighter and lighter as time goes on and then I’d be going back to my old awful blonde highschool days of roots and frazzle (ick). It took me a looooong time to grow my hair back into its natural colour again, so I just get a little freaked out when something like this happens :). As long as it won’t get any lighter and won’t do any damage then, that’s fine.

        Also, you think that I should dilute the baking soda less? Really? I tried that at first and it seemed so harsh, so I thought I’d be doing my hair a favour by diluting it further – and I was even considering diluting it even further because of this whole hair lightening thing. It’s definitely work a shot though and I will give it a try, thank you!

        • admin says:

          Re: Hair lightening?

          Since you apply it so often (every three days) that may be why you’re finding your high lightening a little bit. If you use a standard dilution less often (so your hair spends less time overall within the baking soda solution) it may help. 🙂

          • Re: Hair lightening?

            Thanks so much. I’m sorry to be such a pest with this stuff. I didn’t know that I was applying it too often – I’m sort of slowing working up to going more and more days in between since, before no ‘poo, I used to have to shampoo my hair every day (sometimes twice a day) to curb the greasies. I will try your suggestion though, thanks. It makes sense. Just wondering though – if I used less baking soda (say, halfed the amount) and more water every third or fourth day, would it also help, or am I just crazy? Sorry for all the questions!

            • admin says:

              Re: Hair lightening?

              There’s no real hard and fast rule about “Too often” or “not enough” – it really just depends on your hair! 🙂

              It may help, don’t be afraid to experiment. Baking soda won’t bleach your hair because it doesn’t have the ability to do that. Your hair can only look fritzy and overprocessed when it’s been overprocessed!

              • Re: Hair lightening?

                Thanks :). I don’t blowdry, dye, straighten, or even use any product in my hair (except for the occasional dab of coconut oil in the ends when they need it) so I’ve just been freaking out a little with this hair lightening and getting pretty worried about what’s happening to my hair – so thanks for the reassurance (and for your patience with all of my questions). Thanks again, you’re great!

  • Anonymous says:

    I tried the Baking soda…

    … and it’s weird that it worked. I’ve only used it just the one time today. When I got out of the shower, I was able to run my comb through my hair, as if I had used normal shampoo and conditioners, and there was a minimum of shedding – which is not really normal for me, so I’m thrilled.

    I’m officially sticking with this. Wow.

  • fictionburns says:

    Hi! I found your no-poo method on and have been using it for about two weeks.

    I have a question about your first hairspray, if you don’t mind!
    I’m going on holiday next week, and I wondered if the first hairspray needs to be refridgerated or not? (Also do you think halving the ingredients & using a smaller pan affect the end product, as I don’t use that much hairspray?)

    Also, I’ve been sort of lax about no-poo I guess, I started because I read an article about something similar in a newspaper, except they didn’t use anything, just daily rinses of water.
    I use 1/2 teaspoon of baking soda in water about once a week & coconut oil once a week, with either daily water rinses or every other day rinses in between. I can’t work out if I’m using too much baking soda, not using enough, or what.. My hair is greasy at the roots & dryish at the ends but it’s become very.. gooey. It’s probably still detoxing but I just wanted to see what you thought about my routine!

    Thanks for writing such a great guide!

    • admin says:

      Halving the ingredients should be just fine. 🙂
      Anything made with no preservatives should probably be refridgerated to extend the life, but if you aren’t planning on using it for very long (just a couple of days) I wouldn’t worry about it. Since that first one is made with alcohol, it should be okay sitting out.

      You’re not using enough baking soda, probably. 🙂
      Try one tablespoon for a cup of hot water, massage it in real well (right to your scalp!!) and then rinse it out. Then try mixing up the ACV to condition your hair. Try doing that 2-3x a week for two weeks and see if that helps your hair at all.
      You can also post to which is a pretty new no shampoo community. 🙂

  • iminoline says:

    I’m sorry to bother you, but I’ve been reading all of the related tagged posts in no_poo and almost all of the comments to your original post, and I haven’t seen anything that really answers my specific questions.

    Ok, I started the no ‘poo method. I have thin, fine blonde hair of varying lengths (in the front at my chin or so, and in the back, at about my shoulders). I used shampoo for the last time 4 days ago. Yesterday I washed with BS (2 teaspoons of BS to 1 cup of water) and white vinegar (1 tablespoon of WV to 1 cup of water + 2 drops of rosemary). I let both sit for a while after rubbing them in. I don’t think my hair felt “slick” after the BS, so I will try upping it to 1 tablespoon? And my hair didn’t really feel “soft” after the WV rinse I did, but maybe that’s because I didn’t get everything out with my BS? After it dried it feels like it feels today – kinda like slightly greasy straw (but it’s not too bad).

    And I was also wondering, how often should you do everything? You said anywhere from 1-3x a week for BS? And should you follow your BS with ACV/WV every time? And what I was really confused about was should you use an ACV/WV rinse inbetween BS washes (or just rinse with water)?
    (Ex: Sat – BS + ACV, Sun – ACV, Mon – ACV, Tues – BS + ACV, etc)

    Thank you so much with your awesome post! It was very helpful. ^__^

    • iminoline says:

      Oh yeah, I forgot to mention my other observation – my hair being a little ick might just be detox since I didn’t BS + ACV the first day I went no shampoo like most of the others. My first day was on the second day after not using shampoo, so I might already be in the detox period. And if that’s the case, I can handle less-than-stellar hair, but I was still wondering about the schedule thing? Thank you so so much!

    • admin says:

      Hi there! Glad to see more people trying this. 🙂

      After only four days, your hair hasn’t gone through detox yet and that’s probably why you’re not getting that “slick” feeling. It will take a while for your scalp and hairs to release all the crud built up from years of shampooing. If you have very long hair or were a heavy user, this could take well over a week and you may find your hair seeming “greasy” (while it is not truly dirty) or flat for a little while. This is very normal and will pass, and is not an effect of the Bs/ACV.

      It should be apple cider vinegar, not white vinegar. Just one tbsp of ACV per cup of water is fine, and follow the BS/water cleansing with it. You don’t *have* to do it every time, but it acts like your conditioner and is generally nice to do. 🙂

      And yes, you might want to try your first ‘dose’ of BS/water to be 1tbs per cup – and then adjust from that point. Although you’re not really going to get an accurate reflection until you’ve come out of the shampoo detox.

      • iminoline says:

        ^__^ I’m willing to do what I can to get chemical-free, especially considering how many horrible side-effects there are.

        I read somewhere that white vinegar can be used instead of ACV. If it’s not, I can definitely go pick up ACV instead. Also, should I use the ACV rinse on days when I’m not doing a BS?

        Thank you so much! I’m a little nervous about all of this, but it’s the summer time, so I figure I’ll have more than enough time to detox and get used to this before going back to college. Thank you again!

        • admin says:

          No no, you don’t need to do the rinse on days when you’re not doing the BS.

          I’ve personally found my hair is great if I do it once a week, but I need to up it to twice a week when I’m pregnant because I tend to have more issues with my hair.

          • iminoline says:

            Alrighty. That sounds great. Thank you so much! ^__^ I hope your hair continues to do well. 😀

          • iminoline says:

            Eek, I’m losing my mind. I have yet another question! (Sorry! >__< )

            Can I use white vinegar instead of ACV? I don’t want my hair to darken like I heard the ACV could do (since I have blonde hair). But if they have different properties that require ACV instead, that’s all good. Thanks!

            • admin says:

              I don’t have a lot of personal experience with it, as I’ve only ever used ACV (and I personally haven’t noticed any darkening. In conjunction with baking soda’s lightening effects I think it kind of evens out) but I think the acidity level is different. You might want to ask that in the no_poo or natural_skin community and see if anyone has any personal experience using both.

  • I remember reading something a while ago about how bad shampoo was for your hair, so I haven’t used it for a few months.

    Only now though have I found this helpful essay of yours, and I think I’ll try out the baking soda mix and ACV rinse.

    You said that the smell of the ACV rinses out right? I would still like to have some sort of scent, and I was wondering whether I could add a drop or two of an essential oil to the ACV rinse in order to give it a scent? I’ve always had a thing for mint so I was thinking of adding some of that essential oil to it, would that be harmful at all to my hair?

    • admin says:

      I’m not sure of the effects of peppermint on hair and scalp, except as a good stimulant – but you can always add a few drops to your ACV rinse or create an infusion as described above if the smell bugs you too much. 🙂

      • Anonymous says:

        I have a gunky head

        I stopped shampooing back sometime in March. The problem is that I have some kind of weird gunk coating my hair near the scalp and all over the scalp. WHen I use a ball point pen with the ink part in to scratch and then click the pen to push the ink part out, it pushes out this sticky gray mushy stuff. It’s very visible on my head and makes me feels so disgustingly dirty. I didn’t get this with regular shampoo. I DID get this with shampoos like “Jason” and others that didn’t have the sodium l things.

        I’ve tried rubbing lots of baking soda in, and very little and everything between. I’ve tried going without it. I’ve tried using lots of vinegar, little vinegar, and no vinegar. I even used handfuls of uncooked millet to really SCRUB my head. Nothing gets rid of the gunk. 🙁

        Any suggestions? Please?

        • admin says:

          Re: I have a gunky head

          It wouldn’t be the sls that is making the difference, because that’s just a foaming agent and does nothing to physically clean the head. It’s for appearance.

          How often are you doing this routine? Are you making sure to massage your scalp very well, with fingertips, for at least a minute?
          Do you have a boar bristle brush you could use daily to help stimulate your scalp? Sounds like the buildup just isn’t getting out of there for one reason or another. You might also want to try reposting this question in or

  • this is the most amazing thing i’ve ever read in my entire life.
    :]

  • cheesepuppet says:

    Thank you so much for posting this! I just joined the community after reading this. I had heard about no-poo folks for the last year, but it was always tangential and whenever I went looking for facts about it, I couldn’t find anything. I so appreciate you taking the time to write this.

    I have very short hair too. This works okay for super short hair?

    Thanks again!

  • Would it be alright with you if I copy that whole text to share with friends, etc?

    Always nice to get the author’s permission. Thank you so much for typing all that up!

  • tazthelemon says:

    I didn’t realize how old this post really is!

    I tried this no-poo method a little while ago, around Christmas. It was okay, but not great. My hair was cleaner than if I hadn’t washed it, but still really heavy and lank. My scalp was kind of gunky and smelled funny. It wasn’t just greasiness, though… I ended up with some really nasty, deep split ends.

    I was using two teaspoons of baking soda in about two cups of water, and the same amounts of vinegar. I washed my hair either every other day or on every third day. I’d comb out all the tangles, get into the shower and thoroughly wet my hair, then spray in the baking soda solution (I kept it in a spray bottle, like you’d use to mist plants), rinse it out, finish shaving and the like, turn the water cold, pour the ACV in, then rinse it out.

    Does that sound about right? I’m sick of all my shampoos and conditioners being petro-products/nonvegan/carcinogenic, so I’d like to give it another go.

    • admin says:

      How long did you do it? It sounds like de-tox might have been an issue. I’m also doubting you got enough coverage if you were just spraying it on, i’d try actually pouring it on, out of a glass.

      And you may want to try easing up a little on how often you’re doing it until detox is over and you have a better idea of how often your hair needs it.

  • callme__jane says:

    Wow! I tried the baking soda mix this week, and this morning was the first time I used the rinse. My hair is all volume-y and poofy! Awesome! Thanks for your great information!

  • I switched to this method for cleaning my hair after I was plagued with chronic UTI’s. The same skin irritating chemicals in the bubble bath I was told to avoid were also in my shampoo. Since switching this out and avoiding all unnatural scents and chemicals in my grooming routine I am UTI free. I believe that shampoo was an aggravating factor in my UTI problem and wanted to thank you for posting this alternative. I also had chronically bloodshot eyes- gone. My hair looking great and not breaking like crazy anymore is also pretty awesome. Unlike many who use this method I did not have an “oily transition” but immediate positive results. Thanks a bunch.

    -r

  • claudia_yvr says:

    Shampoo Free

    Thanks for this info! I’ve been wanting to try something like this for a while, but simply rinsing out my hair in the mornings wasn’t doing the trick, plus I was finding that I still needed to use conditioner on the ends or my hair would get hopelessly tangled.

  • supercarrot says:

    hi. i just wanted to let you know i’ve created a no ‘poo community. i’d be honored if you joined.

    also, i was wondering. if i washed my hair too soon after my previous washing, would i not get the slippery feeling? i used 4 cups (4 tbsp BS) and i almost got to the slippery feeling, but my hair also felt like there was a buildup of it afterwards.

    • admin says:

      Did you make sure to use the ACV rinse? That really helps with the build-up, particularly if you’re prone. I tend to get some if I skip it.

      • supercarrot says:

        yeah, but i only used about 1/2 cup of the mixture.

        i had to jump back in the shower the next day and use another 1 cup. that seemed to fix it.

        how ’bout the slippery feeling? do i not need to get to that point, or is it okay if i don’t? the first day i only needed 1.5 cups of the BS mixture, and i slipperyed up real nicely. i didn’t know what i was doing wrong, and 4 cups seems a little excessive.

        thanks for your help. 🙂
        (i’d love it if you added a link to at the bottom of your entry here, do what you want. but if you do, i’d feel so fuzzy and warm inside.)

        • admin says:

          Depends on your hair. If you don’t get to the slippery point and your hair still feels clean at the end – then great! If not, then you probably do.
          Four cups may seem excessive, but the dilution is still the same – you’re not actually using any *more* baking soda than anyone else, you just have more fluid to cover your hair. If your hair is particularly long (as seen in your icon?) you’ll probably need more than someone like me, who can get away with a 1/4 cup.

          I will add a link to no_poo and Natural_skin (which was also put out there for this and OCM), as I’ve been intending to for a while

          • supercarrot says:

            thank you so much. you’ve been a great help. 🙂

            (and just to clarify, since you say “you’re not actually using any *more* baking soda than anyone else” am i supposed to dilute the baking soda when i use more? when i use 4 cups of the solution, i’m using 4 tbsp of baking soda total. am i supposed to keep my total baking soda use down?) i might try using 2 tbsp of BS to 4 cups water next time and see how that works out. thanks again.

            • admin says:

              No no, don’t further dilute it.
              What I meant is that the dilution remains the same, so your hair really isn’t getting any “more” baking soda than someone using one cup – you just have more of the entire mix.
              But you can feel free to adjust the dilution to experiment. Different hair needs different things.

  • hkneale says:

    ThankyouThankyouThankyou

    …for such a wonderful post. I’ve been an advocate of no shampoo for a year and a half now.

    THanks for putting this out there for all the poor people who mistreat their hair with shampoo.

  • daninamoon9 says:

    Wow, this is an idea that has been flitting around the outside edges of my consciousness for awhile. I needed some good solid info on it before I was willing to try. Thanks for saving me from the $12/bottle SLS free shammpoo land. 🙂

  • Im hitting this one up too.
    Does this work on infants? I know you use it on Tempest, but how young was she when you started using this on her?

    • admin says:

      As soon as her hair was long enough to need any sort of washing. 🙂

      • Hmm. Elijah’s hair is about an inch long and he gets the stinky milk hair that warm water will just not help. But it is really fine. I mean, it couldn’t hurt him, could it? I would probably skip the ACV rinse, and just use the BS.

        • admin says:

          The ACV is what will make it soft and shiny and protect it a little longer. Sometimes I skip it on Tempest. I don’t think you’ll notice much of a difference until his hair is long enough to brush and style.

          No, it won’t hurt him. 🙂
          The only reason it would hurt is if he had open wounds on his head, in which case I’d skip it until they’re closed. Baking soda and/or vinegar will both sting a little bit in an open wound.

          • Whoo! I did this today on me (He will get it later. buhwhaha) and my hair feels GREAT! Before the ACV rinse it felt all sticky and clumpy and I was like “Oh god..I messed up!!” and then I did the rinse and WOW! I mean, I KNEW this worked, but to actually see it work is awesome. Not that I wash myhair on a rgeular basis ANYWAYS, but now I am totally going to No-poo! 😉

            And..do you think the smell of ACV is lingering because I didn’t rinse good enough? Or is there another reason?

            • admin says:

              It shouldn’t linger in your hair if you’ve rinsed it clean.
              It might have lingered because:
              You used too much in the dilution
              It got on your skin and didn’t wash clean
              You didn’t rinse your hair through

              And sometimes I notice a little bit of lingering if I do the rinse with hot water instead of tepid. Rarely, but sometimes.

  • rawness says:

    Used it on my daughter today: went well. her hair feels perfectly normal and smells great. Have not used it on the baby yet. Will probably do later tonight.

    Used it on my partner yesterday: felt a little better than usual (although he won’t admit it. hes still not too on board with this idea…im sure he will be when i tell him the 20-45 we spend a month in shampoo [we both have reaaaaally long hair and we use body shop products]) oh and he wants to know if he can use “real” conditioner at all. I said I’d ask you. I called you the guru of baking soda hair stuff 😀

    Despite the risk of a wicked rash from baking soda, I went ahead and tried this because after making a mix up and putting it in cute little bottles I bought (with little S and C stickers on them heehee) I am having okay results skinwise. We’ll see how the hair goes after it dries.

    • admin says:

      He can use only conditioner if he wants. There’s such thing as a conditioner only wash. 🙂
      While I don’t have a ton of information on that, there’s plenty of people who would know more at

      • rawness says:

        I used to do the conditioner only wash. It actually works pretty well – I did suggest that to him but he begrudgingly admitted he’d like to try this first. He’s just wondering if it’s okay to sometimes use storebought conditioner.

        I think he’s having trouble giving up his pretty smelling body shoppe products, though making them smell like lavender has helped him a little (his first wash was unscented).

        • admin says:

          He might like to try a tea-infused rinse instead of the ACV, he might enjoy the smell a little better and it’ll still have him feeling “pretty”. 😉
          Seriously though, I know that half the lure of shampoo is the pretty smell.

          As far as also using conditioner, it’s certainly less damaging than shampoo. If he wants to go that route, make sure he knows not to use too much (it’s really easy to totally overdose on conditioner) and get something high quality. Don’t settle for a $2 bottle with cheap ingredients. There are some wonderful natural brands that he’d probably enjoy.

  • rawness says:

    I’m doing this for my kids. And my hairspray. And I’m going to try and get Austin to do it.

    UNFORTUNATELY I can’t do it for myself as for some reason I have a wicked reaction to baking soda + my hair. Do not know why :(.

    If there a shampoo free ‘recipe’ for women of colour? And the lemon in the hairspray won’t make my hair bleach will it? I just remember as a kid my neighbour would put lemon in her hair instead of sun in.

    • admin says:

      This is the recipe for women of colour. 🙂 This method started with african-american women who were embracing their curly hair, and then moved on to long and thick hair communities. Fine and short hair is really it’s last stop.

      The lemon in the hairspray should not bleach your hair, no. Generally one uses pure lemon to bleach your hair with.

      • rawness says:

        Yaaaaaaaaay. Thank you for your tips. Austin’s whining a bit. “I HATEEEEEE THE SMELL OF VINEGAR”.
        “You don’t have a problem washing diapers with it, or helping me make my bbq sauce”
        “…………”
        “yeah thats what i thought”

  • Anonymous says:

    Baking Soda, Bicarbonate of Soda, and Baking Powder

    Here in the UK, and probably in the US, they sell Baking soda in these round plastic tubs. But be careful, “Baking Powder” is also sold in the same tubs but it is not Baking Soda! Check the ingredients, Supercook’s “baking powder” contains a bunch of nasty long worded added ingredients that you don’t want in your hair.

    “Bicarbonate of Soda” is sold by the same company and is baking soda.

    • vashti says:

      Re: Baking Soda, Bicarbonate of Soda, and Baking Powder

      Little plastic tubs, I spit on thee. They don’t last any time at all if you use baking soda around the house.

      Boots sell 500g boxes of sodium bicarbonate. Look for it with the indigestion remedies. It’s meant for internal use, so you can use it for baking too. 🙂

  • julieannie says:

    I know you’re on leave from the internet and this is an old entry but I was wondering if you’ve tried any of the hair growing tips. I’m detoxing from chemo and looking for the best mix to restore my hair strength and encourage it to grow. I see Catmint, Lavender, Nasturtium and Southernwood all work to encourage growth but is any one better than another?

    I’ve never considered a natural lifestyle until going through cancer and chemo and now I want to find more natural ways to live. You’re a fountain of knowledge when it comes to this stuff.

    • admin says:

      Wow. I hope you’re feeling better. I don’t know what to say!
      I don’t have any personal experience with hair regrowth, or attempting to make it grow faster.

      But, I do suggest you try this question at the community. I’m sure someone there would have some ideas. Sorry I can’t be of more help!

  • onlyagirl86 says:

    Hey! Found this post through naturallivings memories. Such an excellent post – i’ve been wanting to try going no ‘poo for a while now but I didn’t really know where to start/what exactly to do so this is brilliant!

    I’m actually a little worried about how this will go – I have very thick, curly hair and most people I’ve read about using it have fine hair andthey find it fantastic, so I don’t know if this will work for me – but I may as well give it a shot 🙂 x

    • admin says:

      Absolutely give it a shot.
      I believe this started amoung african-american women who were trying to tame their very thick, very curly hair. Then it went over into long hair communities. By no means is it “for” short or fine hair, particularly considering it’s origins. 🙂

  • admin says:

    1. You should be fine with the standard 1:1, and adjust as you see fit. 🙂 That’s really a baseline in which to start.
    2. Nope, you can make the transition just fine! Detox is normal, don’t feel like you need to do this every single day. Your hair will normalize itself once it gets the message that you’re not stripping oils from it every day.

  • I tried this just now and my hair already feels much softer! Thanks for posting this! The nice thing about it is I finally have a use for all of that Apple Cider Vinegar that’s in my cupboard.

  • sillyboho says:

    hey you. old post. i’m trying (again).

    i usually wash my hair every other day with non-slf shampoo and conditioner. i noo’pooed today, and it’s just a TEENY bit oily. should i continue every other day? or wash again tomorrow? the plan as of now is to wash it tomorrow without the acv rinse.

    in case you don’t know (:P) my hair is limp, tends to oily after about 8 hrs, and is very babyfine. it’s a little below my hsoulders these days.

    • admin says:

      If your hair is real fine, I’d make sure you take it easy on the BS mixture because if you overdo it you might end up with strawish hair.

      You can try every other day at first, and gradually stretch it out a little as you go through detox and become more accustomed. But experiment with the mixtures once you’re through detox to figure out what is best for you.

      • sillyboho says:

        cool beans. it was like straw before my acv rinse today, i used 2 tablespoons to two cups of water. i’ll try 1:2 next time. 🙂

      • How long does the detox stage usually last?

        Another question I have is that I usually take a shower/bath every morning in order to clean my body (I think I’m almost OCD about it) and washing my hair is part of that ritual. For this, I know it’s best to do it twice a week as per your entry, but is it going to do anything to my hair if I get it wet during my daily shower (i.e. make it greasy, limp, dry) without using the baking soda?

        • admin says:

          I also have an OCD-like ritual of daily cleansing. 🙂 On days when I’m not washing my hair, I massage my scalp. I have never found it does anything negative to my hair to wet it.

          Detox really depends on your shampoo usage and type of hair. For some people they have none at all, others may battle it for a few weeks, but both are extremes. If detox is very difficult for you, try a boar bristle brush to redistribute the oils, use cornstarch (brush it through) to help soak up some of the oils, or keep your hair in braids. Scalp massage is very beneficial particularly during detox. Your follicles are very used to overproducing oils to help make up for all the stripping that your shampoo has been doing for years. It takes it a little bit to go, “Oh yeah, I don’t need to do this anymore!” and return to it’s natural balance.

          • My hair is short and thick. It also has a tendency to get oily quickly. What kind of detox stage do you think I’ll go through?

            • admin says:

              My hair is like that: short and thick. I was a heavy, heavy, heavy shampoo/conditioner user. Daily basis, deep conditioners. I always thought my hair was so dry and limp.

              My detox took just under a week. I used boar bristle brush once a day and regular scalp massages. I also used a touch more baking soda in my mix (more like 1.5 then 1).

  • crtlion says:

    Hi, I found your journal and this post through 🙂

    I’ve been poo-free for almost two weeks now and like the idea very much, and though my hair hasn’t felt greasy like it normally does nearly as much, it doesn’t feel clean. It’s gotten worse in the past week – when I try to rinse my hair through with water from scalp to ends or massage my scalp with the BS (especially around the crown of my head) I can’t really get my fingers between the hair and the scalp. It feels and sort of looks like there’s some substance in my hair making it stiff and heavy (and frizzy for the first day after I wash it, with some dandruff) that I can’t rinse out, even after just standing under the shower nozzle for a good while. I’m not sure what to change that would help… suggestions appreciated!

    • admin says:

      Wow, I belong to that community! How did I miss my own plug? 😉
      This sounds like detoxing, however…
      You can try a distilled white vinegar dilution to try and get rid of some of the dandruff and scalp issues. Having flakes can be normal after detoxing, because some shampoos literally create a barrier over your head that trap dead skin inside (these are usually marketed as “healthy scalp” shampoos).

      Someone recently made an excellent comment On this post about silicones in shampoos and hair products and how they have a very hard time being washed out. You actually need to get rid of them before you start as they will not leave your hair.

      • crtlion says:

        Oh I meant that I found your journal on obsessiveicons, and found this post through your journal 🙂

        I’ve been waiting until after I try this to reply, and I’m pleased to say the vinegar helped things a reasonable amount. My hair feels much more natural now; maybe that extra acid was what it needed *shrug* It still doesn’t feel “squeaky clean,” but is a vast improvement from feeling like I’d rolled in something. Hopefully detox is ending/will end soon.

        The extra post was useful, thanks; hopefully my hair will still be super easy to take care of without shampoo.

        • admin says:

          I’m glad it’s getting better! I’ve been doing this for a long, long time now and after the initial detox period of about a week (I have extremely short hair, though) I’ve been absolutely loving it. I have volume and bounce in my hair for the first time in my life. 😉

          If you have any questions that you want immediate answers to, or a more varied group, try the community .

  • mma10nam says:

    :X! Quick tiny question for the baking soda mixture. Do you just rub it into your scalp, or do you make sure you get the rest of your hair covered in it as well??

    I love my hair so much and want it to be as healthy as possible, so I hope this method works well for me n-n Thanks a bunch~

  • softanimal says:

    hi again. i’m assuming the hair gel calls for ground flax seeds?

    thanks.

    • admin says:

      Nope. I made it a bit ago, and I haven’t read through this recently but I *believe* you boil them and then let it sit for about 20 minutes and strain out. It just turns to jelly.

      • softanimal says:

        oh. hmmm. i tried it and it definitely produced a jelly like substance. but the flax seeds were still there, intact. i’m assuming then that you strain out the flaxseeds and keep the jelly stuff. i don’t have a strainer with small enough holes. and i think (though may be wrong) that the recipe should be increased, ratio-wise? because it actually doesn’t produce a *huge amount of jelly.

        i’ll try it again!

        thanks.

  • softanimal says:

    i have fine, short, curly hair. can i just add a tad of baking soda to wet hair in the shower? or should i still make up a mixture beforehand?

    thanks for all the awesome info!!

    • admin says:

      You can try adding a tad to wet hair in the shower, but you probably won’t have the same coverage and it’s too easy to “overdose” on the baking soda that way. If it works for you, that’s great! But if it’s your first time I’d try doing the dilution first and getting used to what your hair needs/wants.

  • shala_beads says:

    Thank you so much for writing this. I’ve got long straight incredibly fine hair that gets build up really fast and I don’t use styling products on it! This is great.

  • my hair is sticky!

    I’ve been doing this for around 2 months now, and up until this week I really liked it. But in the last week and a half my hair is incredibly greasy and sticky. It makes it really hard to get a brush through. I’ve tried washing it more, and washing it less, and nothing seems to work. And for a while I’ve had a white buildup under my nails when I scratch my scalp. It doesn’t flake off like dandruff though. What seemed to fix it was going to the ocean. I guess the salt dissolved it, but a few days later it was back.

    I can’t stand having such flat, greasy, sticky hair. Help!

    • admin says:

      Re: my hair is sticky!

      What dilutions are you using? How often? Are you sure it’s rinsing clean? Have you tried brushing through your hair in the shower (if you have very short hair, try brushing more often. I know that I often dont’ brush my hair at all).

      Try cutting back on the ACV mix, or don’t do it as often (or both). Make sure you’re massaging the BS in for a minute at least, and rinsing thoroughly. I dig my fingers in and massage it out, too.

      • Re: my hair is sticky!

        I’ve been using 1 tbs baking soda per cup of water. I make sure my hair is wet and combed before I put it in, then I massage it into my hair and scalp, and rinse it thoroughly. I have a spray bottle with the ACV mix in it but I don’t use it every time I wash my hair. I’m pretty sure I’ve been doing everything right.

        I think I solved the problem though. In the shower yesterday, I combed a lot of conditioner through my hair and left it in for a few minutes and although my hair isn’t completely back to normal, it’s a LOT better. The conditoner I used was Jason’s Vitamin A E & C kind. It’s made with water, aloe, and flower oils- no weird chemicals. Hopefully if my hair gets yucky again I can just use this to help get rid of the gunk.

  • coweatman says:

    how well does this work with dreadlocks?

  • lishd says:

    no ‘poo isn’t for me, but your faq is brilliant. i came here via a link on . nice work on educating people.

    • admin says:

      Thanks so much! And thanks for telling me where you got in from. 🙂

      • lishd says:

        hey, i always want to know how people find my faqs; figured you would, too.

        fwiw, it’s not for me ’cause of what baking soda would do to my dye. but yeah, again, great info that i will help to disseminate.

        • admin says:

          I actually went and saw the community to see where I was mentioned, and noticed the comment about temporary dye. 😉

          I went and read one or two of your FAQs – I have an angry nose piercing (for fault of one toddler, fascinated with shiney things while I sleep…) and everything you have in your FAQ on how to heal a piercing was exactly what my piercer told me. I guess I should be impressed!

          • lishd says:

            granted i rule, but you should be more impressed with yourself for having chosen a piercer who isn’t a complete moron. the world currently has a massive surplus of that type of body “artist”, believe me.

            but yeah, thanks. 😀

            • admin says:

              The one I went to is apparently one of two certified in the country (as Canada has no official certifiation for body piercers yet). He just happened to be in my backwater town! I also went on BMEzine and looked for positive stories from the place I went to. I’d hate to go to one who didn’t know what they were doing, or used a gun for anything.

  • One more question to an old post:

    Do I apply the baking soda mix to hair that´s already wet, or is it supposed to wet it?

    It´s the first day and my hair doesn´t feel as silky as I´m used to, will this pass? Will it stop feeling like straw and start feeling smooth again? I realize this is the first day and I could be detoxing and that curly hair has a different texture than straight hair anyway, but as long as I was asking questions, I thought I´d throw this one in too.

    Thanks so much for this info.

    • admin says:

      Apply to already wet hair, preferably that has been wet with warm/hot water. Rinse with warm for the BS mix, and it’s best to rinse the ACV mix with cooler water.

      It will pass! Did you use the ACV rinse as well? If after 1-2 weeks it’s still feeling this way, adjust your dilutions. Try less BS, and more ACV and see how that does – remember you only need to adjust them by a little bit to make an impact.

  • katschakai says:

    Hi, I know this is a really old post, but I have questions that might be stupid, but I wont know until I’ve asked 😉
    I work out about five times a week and I need to wash my hair then cause my scalp gets really sweaty, can you use baking soda so many times a week?
    And also (and this is more of a double check): can you make a lot of this stuff and have in a bottle or does it go bad?

    • admin says:

      No question is stupid. 🙂
      You can see how your hair reacts that many times a week. I’d try 3x and then do warm water massages at first, and see if that helps, but if not give it a shot and see! Some people’s hair does fine, and others find their hair gets a little “Straw”-like. If you still need it, try adjusting the dilution so there’s less baking soda.

      You can make a lot of stuff in a bottle, but the BS mixture will crystallize. What I do is hold it under a hot shower stream for a few moments and then shake it really hard before I put it on.

  • Wow, thanks so much for typing this all out. I just started this this morning, and I only used the baking soda today, because it was a spur-of-the-moment decision before I got in the shower before work today. I have a few questions, though:

    1) My hair is sort of greasy right now (it usually is, because I hate washing it so when I was using shampoo I went for a few days between washes…) Anyways, during the “de-tox,” am I supposed to do wash my hair with the baking soda as often as I need to get the grease all gone? Or should I try to use a schedule (twice a week, once every three days, etc.) so I don’t see other negative effects from the BS?
    2) I also have a hair-related, impulse control disorder that causes me to either pull hair from my scalp or (right now) pick at the skin of my scalp. (that’s actually one of the reasons that I’m trying to go ‘poo free–to make me happy about my hair). So, if my scalp has any raw skin or tender spots, would you suggest avoiding the ACV, or just trying to keep it away from the spots or what?
    3) My hair gets pretty tangly. Any suggestions for that, other than having to brush it all the way through? I’m lazy and absolutely HATE brushing my hair a ton, but if it’s the only way, I can deal.
    4) In some of the comments, you talked about mixing the BS in warm water and mixing the ACV in cold water. Any reason? And the mixtures don’t have to stay warm/cold, do they?

    I think that covers my questions. I can’t wait to try this out. Thank you so much for sharing all this information with everyone.

    • admin says:

      Hi there! Thanks for commenting. 🙂

      1/ Stick to 2-3 times a week for at least two weeks, but if you’re not seeing any change, then you can change your dilutions a little bit here and there, or how often. Everyone’s hair is different, this is only a guideline! I usually stick with about 1.5 tbl baking soda / cup water, then when I massage around for over a minute I feel a sort of ‘slick’ feeling in my hair and that tells me it’s penetrating.

      2/ I actually have this problem, too. When my scalp is raw, I find the baking soda more irritating then the ACV, but only mildly. It doesn’t really sting so much as it feels annoying. I always did my routine anyway, because I figured 1-2 minutes, 1-2 times a week was okay.

      3/ When my hair was very long, I did a few things that helped it not become so tangled.
      a – Brush from the bottom tips, gradually working your way to the top.
      b – DON’T pull your hair over to one shoulder to brush it, this causes split ends and damage and will end up tangling your hair a lot more.
      c – put your hair in loose braids before bed.
      I never did BS/ACV when I had long hair, only while it’s been short, so I don’t have much personal experience with detangling, but I know a lot of people have had success with a little bit of oil (like coconut oil) worked through the hair while still damp – it also controls frizz very well if that’s a problem for you.

      4/ No, no, they don’t have to stay that way. The BS just needs warm or hot water in order to dissolve properly, but the ACV can do whatever it wants. My BS mixture tends to crystallize pretty quickly, so I usually hold the bottle under the hot shower stream for a little bit and then shake it really hard before I use it.

  • First of all, thanks for posting this! You did an amazing job =)

    When you mention “conditioner” in the 3rd paragraph of the “What Do These Ingredients Do” section, what exactly are you referring to? (I’m assuming not commercial conditioner)

  • Thanks so much for all the great information!

  • siderea says:

    I was just directed here because I’ve started experimenting w/ my hair care regimen. What a great post! Thanks muchly for writing it.

  • azdesertrose says:

    Me being a pest again…

    I have not-quite-waist-length, fine, thick hair, and I’ve been doing the baking soda wash for a few weeks now, and right at first I really liked the way my hair felt.

    I make it up in a 1-quart sports bottle (the spout makes dispensing easy), and the full bottle lasts me 3-4 washings, which is to say about 1.5-2 weeks. I add a few drops of rosemary essential oil to the baking soda wash, and a few drops of both rosemary and lavender essential oils to the ACV rinse, which I use about every other wash.

    But here in the last two weeks or so, my scalp is horrendously itchy, I have dandruff for the first time since adolescence (although the white vinegar rinse helps with that) and my hair has turned stringy and tangled and it feels “tacky”, as if it’s lightly coated in something sticky.

    When my hair first started feeling a bit greasy, I backed off on the ACV. I had been doing an ACV rinse with every wash, and I backed up to every other. I also reduced the dilution, from 3 tbsp ACV/3 cups water to 2 tbsp ACV/3 cups water.

    Is this just the buildup of years of shampooing coming off or am I doing something wrong?

    • admin says:

      Re: Me being a pest again…

      How long are you massaging each into your scalp? A scalp massage can be very important! I work it in a minimum of 1 minute until my hair feels sort of “slick” (from the BS mix. With the ACV I just count off a minute or so).

      Could it be possible you’re not completely washing out the baking soda mix? If there’s any left over it can build up.

      Detox usually takes place initially, but can last longer if you have long or thick hair.

      • azdesertrose says:

        Re: Me being a pest again…

        Thanks for the suggestions.

        I always have done a good bit of scalp massaging when I wash my hair, because my hair is so thick and long. I like to make sure that I get it thoroughly clean.

        I thought that maybe I wasn’t rinsing thoroughly enough (which can be an issue for me, as my hair is quite thick). When I showered last night I didn’t wash at all, I just gave it a very thorough rinsing, but that doesn’t seem to have helped very much.

        I don’t want to give up on “no-poo” because I really would like to get away from using so many chemicals on my hair and skin, but I also want my hair and skin to feel nice. *sheepish grin*.

        I’m going to try adding brown sugar to the BS mix and see if that helps.

        You wouldn’t happen to have any suggestions for a natural build up remover, would you?

        Thanks again for all your help.

        • admin says:

          Re: Me being a pest again…

          Try brushing your hair 1-2x a day with a boar bristle brush. Sometimes that can really help, too. 🙂

          Also make sure that when you do a shower with no wash, that you’re still giving yourself a warm water scalp massage. Particularly important with longer hair.

          • azdesertrose says:

            Re: Me being a pest again…

            The brushing might help. I do use a boar-bristle brush.

            A lot of the time, I braid my hair once it’s dry and just leave it that way for a day or two. It might help to take it down and give it a good brushing.

            Thanks again. You’re very helpful.

            • admin says:

              Re: Me being a pest again…

              I hope it passes quickly for you!
              I first heard about this method from a long hair community, and if you still have problems it might be worth it to check something out there. 🙂 Is the link included in this article?

              • azdesertrose says:

                Re: Me being a pest again…

                Well, I made a post in asking the same question, as I know you have short hair, and long hair sometimes behaves a little differently than short hair.

                There are a lot of people in that community who use conditioner-only washes, but that seems like it would make my hair too greasy. I’ve gotten a lot of interesting suggestions from the community; I’m going to try the brown sugar bit, and see if brushing my hair a bit more often and the thorough-rinse/warm water scalp massage helps, too.

  • hey i just found this and it sounds great.

    i have a question that may be kinda stupid. if you’re making the solution of the baking soda with the cup of water, do you use the entire solution when you shower, or do you just use a little?

    i just tried it and i used maybe a 1/3 cup cause i was trying to get it all over my head. i’m just a little confused.

    anyway, the acv seems to work well!

    thanks!

    • admin says:

      Use as much as you need. 🙂 I usually make it up in a bottle (which equals about 1.5 to 2 cups of solution) and use as needed. It lasts me a few weeks normally, but both my husband and I have very, very short hair.

  • azdesertrose says:

    Question about dandruff stuff

    Dandruff:
    To help control dandruff you can use a mild acidic solution on your scalp, before shampooing, about twice a week.

    — 1/2 cup Water
    — 1/2 cup of White Vinegar
    Combine ingredients then apply directly to the scalp. Use before shampooing. Apply twice a week.

    Would this work with ACV or does it have to be white vinegar?

    (Sorry for the earlier anonymous comment, I forgot to log in.)

  • Anonymous says:

    Dandruff:
    To help control dandruff you can use a mild acidic solution on your scalp, before shampooing, about twice a week.

    — 1/2 cup Water
    — 1/2 cup of White Vinegar
    Combine ingredients then apply directly to the scalp. Use before shampooing. Apply twice a week.

    Would this work with ACV or does it have to be white vinegar?

  • ((((((((((Hair Mousse (Not vegan):
    1/4 cup of plain gelatin
    1 cup warm water
    Dissolve 1/4 teaspoon plain gelatin in 1 cup boiling water. Let sit at room temperature until slightly set. Rub into dry or wet hair, and blow dry. ))))))))))))))))

    It took you a long time to type this up and I don’t mean to point the only typo you made in the whole thing but I am really interested in trying this hair mousse idea! In the Ingredients section you mention 1/4 cup of plain gelatin but in the directions portion you say 1/4 teaspoon, I was just wondering which one it is, I can’t wait to try it and see how it turns out!

  • long hair, hard water

    I have waist-length hair. I usually put conditioner in it in the shower and comb it through before I rinse it, otherwise it gets REALLY tangled. I want to try this method but I’m not sure how I’m going to keep it from getting matted if there’s nothing slippery coating my hair.

    Another thing is that we have really gross hard water that turns everything orange and smells like eggs. I thought my hair was just naturally ugly until I went for a mineral rinse at a salon 6 months ago and my hair was gorgeous for a few days. The stylist said that my hair was full of crap from our water. I’m wondering if there’s anything I can do about that.

    • admin says:

      Re: long hair, hard water

      You can try a baking soda soak. Do a normal dilution and try wrapping your soaked hair in a towel for about 10 minutes before rinsing. Also leave the ACV in a bit before you rinse it out – see if that helps. You may need to lower the dilutions (add more BS/ACV to the water) to help, too.

  • This is great, thanks! I was just asking about shampoo alternatives for my grandmother and someone sent me here! Thanks for all the information!

    ~kiki

  • miss_teacher says:

    Thank you for all this information!

    I just started this method this week. It was weird since it feels completely different on your hair. Shampoo makes my hair very slick in the shower and the baking soda mixture make it feel more coarse. I was afraid that it was going to be tangled andhard to brush when I got out. But it wasn’t at all!

    I think I’m still stuck on normal washing routines. I only waited two days to wash again since my hair looked a teeny bit greasy in one part. I am going to try waiting longer and see if it makes a difference.

    I am going to try to get my husnanmd to convert, too. He frequently has a dry scalp so I’m hoping this helps.

    Also you mentioned hard water but I wasn’t quite sure what that did for this method. How does hard water effect this? We have pretty hard water where we live.

    • admin says:

      The hard water mentions were talking about the evolution of soap, shampoo, and the effects. 🙂
      I have hard water here, apparently – and haven’t noticed any problems.

  • Anonymous says:

    help!

    Hi babyslime,

    I’ve been trying the “poo-free” routine for a little over a week now, and so far it seems to be working out. However, I was hoping you could help me with something.

    Since going poo-free, my hair has been falling out in increasingly larger amounts!! When I was shampooing, I was used to having a small amount fall out during a shower, maybe 10-15 strands, but recently, I’ve been losing 4-5 times what I used to. It’s literally so much hair that I’m a little scared to keep up with the poo-free!

    Any suggestions? If it matters, I have medium-long, straight, fine hair. I’ve been substituting ACV with lemon juice, and I do a BS/LJ wash a couple times a week.

    Thanks very much.

    • admin says:

      Re: help!

      I don’t think that it’s the routine that is making your hair fall out, that’s unheardof! I’d be more inclined to think it’s an unrelated problem, or perhaps more vigorous scrubbing of your scalp is getting out more hairs that were already out but not displaced yet…
      It’s normal to lose some hair during the day, I believe the average is 80-something. You might want to ask this question in the community, or perhaps and see what they have to say!

  • kimmlett says:

    I just started this yesterday and that rinse is fantastic! I usually wake up with my hair in tangles and my hair is super smooth. The only downfall is the smell of ACV.. lol yuck! I have a question, after reading through the comments, I only have to do this 2-3 times a week? Do I do the baking soda thing every other day? Do I do the ACV rinse every other day too? I just find it hard to believe because everytime my hair gets wet, I get tangles since my hair is super thick. Would it be bad to do this everyday?

    Thanks!

  • arianamama says:

    I’ve been doing this for two weeks and I like it. I’ve never been a daily hair washer so this works well for me. My heair is much fuller, which I’m not actually sure I like. 😉 My hair is already really full and thick. I think I’m going to try one of the dry hair treatments soon.

    Hopefully I’ll eventually be able to convince dh to try this. We’ll see. He’s not very crunchy, except when it comes to child care.

    Anyway I wanted to say Thank You!

    • admin says:

      If your hair is TOO full, you can always try upping the ACV or lessoning the baking soda in the dilutions and see if that changes it for you. 🙂

      I’m glad you’re having success with it!

    • admin says:

      BTW, I was thinking about this question the other night. I can’t believe I didn’t think of this: coconut oil! If your hair is too full you can rub some coconut oil on your hands and kind of run your fingers over your hair. It also works great if you have curly hair, to define your curls. It’ll come right out with the baking soda wash the next time you do it.

      • arianamama says:

        Oh you’re so sweet. The fullness thing isn’t like a “problem”. I kind of think that if this is the way my hair is meant to be naturally, then that’s cool. I’m sure it’s a big blessing for those with fine hair. I’m going to keep playing around with it but it’s not like it’s not working and I’m going to stop or anything. In fact this week I convinced my sister to try it too. Now she’s working on getting her husband to do it.

        I don’t think I am going to try the coconut oil. I have a very strong aversion to all coconut and coconut smells to have that in my hair would kinda gross me out. If I was really unhappy with my hair I guess I’d give it a shot but it’ll be a last resort thing. 😉

        I did have another question though. What do you do with Tempest? Do you use the baking soda and ACV? I can’t imagine getting the vinegar in my boys’ eyes. Right now I don’t wash their hair often. I wet it down like once a week or if there’s a reason and I shampoo their hair like once a month or so.

  • I know you posted this a long time ago and if you don’t have answers I was considering joining the natual(beauty) communities –but I do dye my hair and would like to switch to baking soda and oil for washing and conditioning… [I’m pretty Americanized in my hair routines– I dye it every two months or so, use shampoo and conditioner every 2-3 days, hair product, blowdryer, straightener or curling iron, etc. etc. I’ve stopped using products and lessened my blow drying tendencies but it just makes me more aware of the damages.]
    If I used henna to dye my hair would the color fade less with the baking soda washing? Or perhaps should I dye my hair again before starting no-poo methods?
    I’m so curious and anxious to try a more natural approach to my hair and skin. Any information would be appreciated!
    Thank you for writing this!

    • admin says:

      I’ve considered dying my hair again recently, and this is what I was going to do: make sure my no-poo routine is well established, because then I’m only washing once or twice a week. Do a fresh ‘wash’ and then dye your hair. Whenever I use dye I ALWAYS let it ‘set’ on my hair for a minimum of three days before I do my first shampoo (I haven’t dyed my hair since going no-poo. Not because of no poo, but just because it hasn’t occured to me).
      Then you’re only washing your hair 1-2x a week. Maybe do the ACV rinse every time, because dyed hair is prone to getting very dry. I’d imagine the BS/ACV washes so infrequently would end up lengthening the time your hair is coloured, because most people shampoo their hair every day or every other day – and that’s much more stripping.

  • haute_chic says:

    what an awesome post! Thank you so much for taking the time to write this!

  • Thanks for this info 🙂
    I love baking soda and vinegar and couldn’t live without them. But while I use them to clean….I never parlayed that cleaning over to my hair! I have been washing my long hair with just tea tree soap for a while to get my hair ready to dread (which I started last night). I am wondering if anyone has dreads and uses the baking soda method of cleaning?

    peace
    Willow

    • admin says:

      I have no idea if anyone here does. I just gave this info to , who has a dread, but I’m not sure if she’s actively using this method yet.

      • sraedi says:

        Actually, I just mixed up my hair stuff tonight! I’m about to go wash and wanted to check here first to make sure I didn’t mess up. ; ) I hope it’s okay if I rinse the ACV out with non-cool water! : o

        I plan on letting you know how it works for me so if there are any note able affects to my dread, I’ll point it out. : ) I don’t usualy make much of a point of washing my dread, I just smush it in with the rest of my hair but it seems like with this stuff I’ll have to actually pay it mind in the shower.. We’ll see!

  • l_kristin_l says:

    I read your entire article, and even went to motowngirl in order to get a full understanding of this method. I must admit though (and appologize), I am still a bit confused. So my questions to you are:

    1. You talked about doing your regular “shampooing” using the ‘baking soda + water, ACV + water’ method. However, motowngirl talks about doing ‘conditioner-only washes’, and the occassional baking soda thing, only for clarifying. So is this baking soda method meant for regular use? If it is, I’d prefer it, because it seems that ‘conditioner-only washes’ aren’t as detoxifying as using plain old, simple baking soda and water.

    2. Are the ACV rinses meant to be a conditioner conditioner? I know you said that you shouldn’t do them every time, but then what would you use to condition your hair in between? (I’ve done ACV rinses before, only they were for clarifying my hair, so I guess it’s hard for me to see how ACV could be an effective enough conditioner…??)

    Or maybe I’m so brainwashed by the commercial shampoos and conditioners, that I’m not getting that (perhaps?) once I’ve detoxed my hair using this method, my hair will have no need for adding on artificial conditioners, because it will use its own natural oils instead…? [I, again, appologize for the questions and, now, the length of this. I’m just so interested in this, as I’m a big advocate on going as pure, simple and natural as possible!]

    • admin says:

      Don’t apologize! They are good questions.

      1/ The conditioner-only method is just a different method. Personally I prefer baking soda, too. 🙂 I use it regularly, or at least as ‘regularly’ as my hair needs it (around 2x a week now that I’m pregnant, about 1x or even less before).

      2/ Yup, they are as a conditioner. It really does work! I didn’t say you shouldn’t use it every time, I just meant you didn’t need to. I use it more often now, because my hair has changed, but you shouldn’t feel like you HAVE to do both at once – that’s all. 🙂 Your hair will feel very soft and silky after an ACV rinse, though.

      • sparrowrose says:

        now that I’m pregnant

        Congratulations on that!!

        I’m still going to write the more extended review I promised (most likely posting it in my usual long hair community plus the “poor skills” community (for people who like to live on the cheap) and then posting another comment here, linking to them so you can have a read if you’d like. I’m just waiting to do a full review until I’ve used this method for about a month because i know it takes a while for hair to “settle in” with new stuff and I want to get a full experience before I write it all up.

        I’ve been doing it since I posted here before, though, and my preliminary report is: WOW!!! This stuff is great! Thanks!!!

  • sraedi says:

    Okie doke, queen of natural stuff.. I just want to check to make sure I have this right…

    Regular Wash: 1 cup water(warm, to make sure the baking soda mixes in) and one teaspoon baking soda

    Conditioning Rinse(to be used less often and in a seperate bottle): two tablespoons of Apple Cider Vinegar in one cup of water

    That correct?

    • sraedi says:

      Use it like normal shampoo/conditioner? In the shower, water running? Rubbie, rubbie, rinse? I see that you’re supposed to let the conditioner sit for a minute, same for the regular wash?

      *gets confused if there’s too much text* ; P

      Ah.. If you make a mix to sit around between showers, that’s okay? Not nessecary to make it before every shower?

      • admin says:

        With the baking soda, rub it in for about a minute, get a good massage going. Since it doesn’t lather like regular shampoo does, you gotta rub it around a little more to make sure it covers your hair. 🙂
        You don’t have to let the conditioner sit, but most people find it helps a little bit.

        What I do is massage each into my hair for 30-40 seconds. With the baking soda, I wait until my hair feels a little slick (then I know it’s covered all my hair), then rinse. With the ACV I wait until it feels soft, then rinse.

        I let my bottles sit until they’re out. The ACV is no problem, but the baking soda tends to crystallize. I take a shower every day so even on the days I don’t use it I give it a hard shake to make sure it doesn’t get TOO crystalize-y.

    • admin says:

      Almost!
      One cup warm/hot water + one tablespoon baking soda.

      Try one tablespoon in each at first, and see how your hair reacts. Then adjust depending on how you do. You can always make huge bottles up, just keep the dilutions the same.
      IE. right now my hair changed how it reacts, so I put about 1.5 tablespoons BS per cup of water, and only one tablespoon ACV per cup of cold water. That works well for me. I also find that I need to do the ACV rinse more often now or my hair starts to feel a tiny bit bit greasy on the top after about a week. Ironically, it actually looks kind of cool and makes it easy to style… nothing like the grease I used to get when I used shampoo. I’m just big on textures and it bugs me.

      • sraedi says:

        Hah! I meant to say tablespoon. Sometimes I am silly wirh words. : P : ) Thanks!

        (Geasey fter ONLY a week? geeze! You’re so demanding! ; ) )

        Dig what you mean about styling with slightly dirty hair. It doesn’t help me much since my hair is unstyleable, mostly.. But I like it when it looks a little dirty, day or two after(with normal shampoo) or whatever ; P

    • sraedi says:

      Alright.. I tried this for nearly two months and it never worked out well for me. The bottom half of my hair would get clean but the top half(where I poured it on) never did.. after what I thought should’ve been the detox period, I tried gradually watering down my mix but noo.. What am I doing wrong? It seems to work okay for every other person! Pthbt.

      • admin says:

        don’t water down your mix, try increasing it – maybe your hair needs more. 🙂
        Try 1 cup hot water, 2tblsp baking soda. Skip the ACV at every wash, and try and use it only once a week while you do your BS wash 2-3x a week. Try this for two weeks and see how your hair does.
        Make sure you leave it on for a MINIMUM of one minute, massaging the whole time. Massage until your hair feels “slick” with the baking soda mix – then you know it’s really gotten all over. If you never get a slick feeling, decrease the water a little more and see if that helps.

        Right now I’m using :
        1 cup hot water/2 tbl baking soda, 2x per week
        1 tbl ACV / 1 cup cold water, 1x per week

        But I occassionally have to adjust because with the hormonal changes I’m going through my hair is constantly shifting.

        • sraedi says:

          Okay!!! It worked better this time!! When I made my mix, I put 2 tbs powder and 1 1/2 cups of water.. then i read this again and went oops and added 1 tsp to even it out. : P last time i was worried about.. i dont know. worried! i do that. but this time i didnt bother so much.. when i got into the shower my hair wasnt very dirty.. it wasnt dirty enough to feel greasy when i went into the shower. i think thats another problem i had before. i didnt know what you meant about the slickness really since my hair was already slick when i started.. but since my hair wasnt very dirty today and i had more baking soda than i did when i started the last time(i think) it was pretty obvious… so i dumped some on and then rubbed it around for awhile and when one side of my head wouldnt get to feeling slick i just dumped some more on. end result, it WORKED. if only i’d just asked before. : P

          im just silly and mental. at first i didnt want to ask because i dont know why! : P then eventually i got discouraged and gave up. at first i didnt ask because i was lazy and discouraged and then i didnt want to try again in case it didnt work that time either…. anyway, its okay now. uhm.

          yay, it works!!

          someone asked once about my dread and it seems good. i think my dread likes it. it feels a bit softer than i remember it being before.

          • admin says:

            I’m glad it’s working for you! Don’t be afraid to use a whole mix in one sitting. As you get better at it you’ll probably use less, and you can probably find a place that sells baking soda in bulk anyway. 😉 It’s not like it’s that expensive! No worries.
            Relax, it’s just hair! 😀

            • sraedi says:

              wow, a whole mix in one sitting!! You’re a maniac! ^.^ I’ll remember that. : D

              I’m glad I got it to work. I felt a bit dumb because everyone else was doing fine. : P I’ll try to keep you updated on my dread lock!!

              I will miss soap bubbles but thankfully my boyfriend’s very hairy and suds up really well, unlike me. : P

        • sraedi says:

          I am completely dying my hair friday!!

  • sparrowrose says:

    Hi! I found this post through . I’ve been a conditioner-only washer up to now but have been getting tired of how long it takes (it has to sit on the hair for at least ten minutes to get it clean) and also wanted to try going with something less chemically and more natural if possible.

    I will be giving your method a try! I’ve done ACV rinses before, so I already know how great those are, but I’ve never washed with baking soda before so that will be something new.

    A tiny suggestion: at first I wasn’t going to start this until I had a chance to go to the store and get more ACV (I’m currently out) because I erroneously believed that the method required doing an ACV rinse every time you do a baking soda wash. It’s not clear how it’s written, so I was kind of assuming the ACV was required to rinse the baking soda out properly or that maybe there was a reaction between the two that is required.

    Then I read through all the comments and when I got to the end, I saw that you *don’t* have to do ACV every single time you do BakSod.
    You might want to add a single sentence in the section with the actual dilution “recipes” noting that you don’t have to do both of them together every time in case other people have the same confusion I did.

    Thanks for you hard work typing this all up! I’ll be sure to come back within the month to give a follow-up about how it’s working for me!

  • thirty_three says:

    Just a wee testimonial….

    Ava, Miles and I are on Week 5 of being shampoo-free and Brad is on Week 2 and I’m happy to report that we are converts. I went from washing Ava’s hair almost daily to 1-2 times a week.

    You’re a hair guru, Babs. :p

    • admin says:

      😀 Thank you!
      I’ve never used shampoo on Tempest’s hair, and it’s never once been greasy! I wash it only when she’s got crap in it (you know, like food that won’t come out) and it’s always soft and fluffy.

  • I have a really stupid question (I stumbled upon this post in someone’s memories by accident…I hope you don’t mind this query from a random person): will the ACV make your hair smell bad?

  • Just like the previous. I found this through weddingplans. I have been trying it for a week and I keep playing with my hair for how soft it is. I still use a conditioner through the body shop that is all organic olive oil one because my hair is VERY fine and it is something it still seems to need. However, with using the shampoo that is supposed to go along with it, my hair would get greasy in a day *nearly like an oil slick* and I have not had that results now. i might be able to handle growing my hair out now for my wedding. I was about to cut it all off!

  • shaula82 says:

    Interesting…result

    Hi! I’ve been thinking about going poo-free for ages, and I finally tried it this morning. My hair is still wet, but feels and looks fine. However – the skin of my face, my upper back and my chest has gone furiously red, and is burning and itching. Ditto with my scalp. (I followed the instructions carefully, by the way).

    I was wondering if this is a common problem, and it it’s only temporary and stops happening after a while. Or if not, are there any work-arounds? Should I dilute the baking soda and the vinegar further? If so, will the solutions be as efficient for my hair?

    Thanks!

    • admin says:

      Re: Interesting…result

      Hmm, I’ve never heard of anyone having that reaction. Do you think you have an allergy to baking soda or apple cider vinegar?
      Did you have any open skin? Sometimes vinegar can burn a little if your skin is raw (like from scratching, or a sunburn).

      Try a spot test. Make a thick paste of baking soda and apply a dot to the inside of your wrist. Do the same with undiluted ACV. Wait 10 minutes and see if you develop a welt or big itchy spot. If you do, then you are probably allergic!

      • shaula82 says:

        Re: Interesting…result

        Thanks for the quick reply! I’ll do the spot test and see how I go. I hope it’s okay, because my hair feels soft and fab!

        If it’s not the ingredients themselves, but the concentration, do you think the mixture will still work if it’s more diluted?

        • admin says:

          Re: Interesting…result

          It might. I have very thick, coarse hair and I find that I have to up my baking soda a bit. But, my husband has finer hair and can do fine with less then is in the standard dilution.
          If you don’t have a reaction to the spot test, you can rule out allergy and I’d vote more for “fluke”. If it STILL keeps bothering you, try rinsing it out by bending over and holding the shower head over your head (is this making sense?)
          I always rinse my ACV out that way because I can’t stand touching my body with cooler water. I’m a hot shower freak. 😉

  • I have REALLY long frizzy, curly hair right now. If I dont put products in my hair it frizzes out madly!

    Plus, I always have to use conditioner…lots of it…or I use silk therapy leave in conditioner…it feels like oil that I put in my hair.

    Anyways, my question is will this work for me?

    I usually wash my hair everyday.
    I tried going everyother day without washing my hair, but when I get my hair wet it dries out, but when I have gel in my hair and I dont use shampoo, It doesnt dry out (but I think this is just because I dont get all the gel out or something)

    So, how would I use this so that it works well with my hair?

    Will it condition my hair also, or would I need to buy something else for that?

    Will it make my hair so that I dont need styling products to control the frizz?

    How often do I wash with this? I read that you need to start slowly with this if you usually wash your hair everyday…what steps would you recommend? Shampoo, skip a day, your mix, skip a day, shampoo etc…?

    Sorry for all the questions, this is just really interesting to me and I would love to use it.

    • admin says:

      I know someone with long frizzy hair who likes this method. She doesn’t need styling products to control her frizz when she uses this 🙂 The method seemed to be founded by a large group of african-american women to control their “nappy” hair, so I have no doubt it would work for you. You just have to find your niche.

      The ACV mixture conditions, it’s all explained in the essay.

      The reason your conditioner feels like oil is because it is oil. 😛 It’ll end up making your hair frizzier.
      Be prepared to put it in a braid and tuck it away if you have trouble with detox, but it won’t last long, so don’t worry. 🙂 You will not need to do this every day. Detox for a few days, then do a wash. Remember greasy hair is not dirty hair, so don’t wash it again just because it feels greasy, this is a normal part of detox and getting all the nasty stuff gone.
      Try every three days at first. Adjust your solution if you feel you need it
      (IE. if your baking soda solution is not giving you the ‘squicky’ feel when you’re scrubbing it in, try adding a tich more. But do not go overboard. “frizzy” hair will not react well to too much baking soda in the solution.)

      You can double or triple to cover all your hair, but it’s the dilution you’re not supposed to adjust too much.
      Don’t go back and forth from shampoo to this mixture. It won’t work at all. Shampoo slathers your hair in crap and will make it impossible to return to it’s natural state. It’s all or nothing.

      Hope this helps.

      • Thank you SO much!

        Im not very worried about my hair getting greesy…I really dont think thats possible with me…really….

        My one question is…

        Can I still use the hair gel that I have been using? Or do I have to use the homemade one you suggested above in order for this entire thing to work?

        • admin says:

          You can use whatever you want on your hair, but brush it out of your hair every night at least. 🙂 You might find you need to use this method more often if you use gel all the time.
          I usually use the home-made gel but just recently I had my hair cut and picked up some of that fibre stretching short hair stuff. I find that I need to adjust my method when I use it and let the baking soda sit a few minutes instead of washing it out immediately. Otherwise, I don’t notice a difference so long as I’m brushing it out every night.
          Usually a hot daily shower (without washing) will get most of it out of your hair anyway.

          • Ok, I went to the store and bought all the stuff I need. It came to $5.50 🙂 Cheaper than buying a bottle of my shampoo and conditioner!

            Tonight Im going to do the baking soda wash and the ACV wash.

            I also made up some conditioner stuff from motowngirl website…it had honey and olive oil in it. But Im not going to use that tonight.

            I put the honey conditioner and the ACV wash in a bottle, but Im going to take a tablespoon of baking soda in with me and make that paste like you suggested…I think it would be easier than the other ways.

            I am planning on washing my hair with the baking soda wash every 3 days.

            But how often do I use the ACV wash and the honey conditioner? I think I only use the honey conditioner whenever my hair seems dried out, or only once or twice a month. But how about the ACV wash?

            Can/should I use that everyday? (I take a shower every night…its my relaxation from a long day…plus I like to wash out my gel that I put in my hair) As of right now, I put gel in my hair everyday…in order to control the frizz.

            Thank you so SO much! I cant wait to get better hair!!

            • admin says:

              Go by what your hair needs. 🙂 For me personally I find a baking soda wash every 3-4 days and an ACV rinse every week does me really well. If I’m going out, or want my hair especially shiny I do a baking soda wash/ACV rinse that night.
              Remember that making a paste with the bake. soda will make it more concentrated, and if your hair is particularly dry it may make it feel frizzy. So if you find that, try diluting it the next time.

      • Anonymous says:

        GREASE! Help!

        Please help! I’ve been using the baking soda solution to wash my hair and it has been great for months!

        My hair never went through that “greasy” beginning phase as I got used to washing with baking soda and conditioning with ACV. But now I do have that problem, about 5 months from the time I started washing this way.

        I am very careful to use the correct measurements of baking soda to water, and ACV to water. I do not use ACV every time. I add the ACV solution to the ends of my hair only (greasy problem became much worse when I was massaging it into my scalp, so I stopped doing that once I read the comments here saying to only add it to the ends).

        Once it’s dry, my freshly washed hair is cold to the touch with this “grease” on the hair nearest to my scalp, and running my fingers through my hair (which used to be a pleasure) is awful now, and feels like I have all kinds of build up in my hair. It’s not in my head… when I handle my hair or run my fingers through it, my hands are coated in this greasy substance and a comb run through my hair becomes caked with a sticky lint (exactly like the stuff on a dirty brush that needs to be washed) and I’m talking about hair I just washed! It is so frustrating.

        The LAST thing I want to do is run into the arms of Pantene. I want to stick with baking soda, but I’m at the end of my rope. It’s been about 4 weeks now that my hair has been acting like this.

        Some notes about my hair: it is long, straight, and “normal” (meaning that normally, my hair is not overly oily or dry).

        From my earlobes on down, my hair is still as beautiful and soft as ever with this method. I just want this maddening phase to end so that I can start enjoying my clever, economical hair care system again. 🙁

        • admin says:

          Re: GREASE! Help!

          I have to change the dilutions and mixes just slightly during different seasons, or different hormonal changes (when I’m pregnant, for instance, my hair is greasier and I have to add more baking soda to that mix and cut back on the ACV). Experiment with your mixtures a bit. 🙂

        • Anonymous says:

          Re: GREASE! Help!

          I know this is quite a while later than the original post, but maybe someone else is having the same problem. I had the same situation, no real problems at the beginning even though I was expecting a transition period; my hair seemed to be in great shape. Then about a month and a half in, it started getting really waxy and coated feeling, and left disgusting grey gunk on my brush and fingers when I ran my hands through it. I’ve been looking around for a solution and here’s what I’ve come across:

          -if you have hard water then it can react with the baking soda to create a waxy scum that coats your hair. People have suggested using a salt and water solution instead of BS to wash with

          -your hair and skin is naturally acidic, so make sure you always follow an alkaline wash (ie. the baking soda) with an acidic wash (ie. vinegar, a citrus solution, or tea have all been suggestions I’ve come across). You can do an acidic rinse by itself, but don’t use a basic rinse without following it with an acidic one; it upsets the natural pH of your scalp and hair if you do

          -I tried just using a rinse of some lemon juice mixed with water, and that significantly decreased the gummy, waxy residue on my hair, although it returned again when I used the BS again. I have brown hair which I’m not particularly interested in lightening, so I don’t want to rinse with lemon often, for someone with blonde hair the lemon would probably work just fine, I’m going to try the salt water method, and rinse with either tea (apparently black works better, it’s a bit more acidic, although still less than vinegar) or vinegar, and only use BS on occasion, as it seemed to be a build-up of residue over time that just wasn’t being shifted by the acid rinse after that was the problem.

          -a really good forum that had a lot of info on people trying and troubleshooting different no poo methods I found at
          http://community.livejournal.com/no_poo

          Hopefully that’s useful to someone out there!

        • Anonymous says:

          Re: GREASE! Help!

          I know this is quite a while later than the original post, but maybe someone else is having the same problem. I had the same situation, no real problems at the beginning even though I was expecting a transition period; my hair seemed to be in great shape. Then about a month and a half in, it started getting really waxy and coated feeling, and left disgusting grey gunk on my brush and fingers when I ran my hands through it. I’ve been looking around for a solution and here’s what I’ve come across:

          -if you have hard water then it can react with the baking soda to create a waxy scum that coats your hair. People have suggested using a salt and water solution instead of BS to wash with

          -your hair and skin is naturally acidic, so make sure you always follow an alkaline wash (ie. the baking soda) with an acidic wash (ie. vinegar, a citrus solution, or tea have all been suggestions I’ve come across). You can do an acidic rinse by itself, but don’t use a basic rinse without following it with an acidic one; it upsets the natural pH of your scalp and hair if you do

          -I tried just using a rinse of some lemon juice mixed with water, and that significantly decreased the gummy, waxy residue on my hair, although it returned again when I used the BS again. I have brown hair which I’m not particularly interested in lightening, so I don’t want to rinse with lemon often, for someone with blonde hair the lemon would probably work just fine, I’m going to try the salt water method, and rinse with either tea (apparently black works better, it’s a bit more acidic, although still less than vinegar) or vinegar, and only use BS on occasion, as it seemed to be a build-up of residue over time that just wasn’t being shifted by the acid rinse after that was the problem.

          -a really good forum that had a lot of info on people trying and troubleshooting different no poo methods I found at
          http://community.livejournal.com/no_poo

          Hopefully that’s useful to someone out there!

      • sewcute says:

        Can I mix up a batch of this and just use it as needed? or will I need to make it up each time I shower?

        How often should I wash my hair using this? Right now I am washing my hair every other day, should I stick with that? or more or less?

        • admin says:

          You can make up a one cup batch and just let it go however long it lasts. 🙂

          I would cut back from every other day and start at 1-2 times a week, then after you go through the detox period adjust as needed for your hair – but most people don’t need to do it more than 1-2x a week. 🙂

        • admin says:

          You can make up a one cup batch and just let it go however long it lasts. 🙂

          I would cut back from every other day and start at 1-2 times a week, then after you go through the detox period adjust as needed for your hair – but most people don’t need to do it more than 1-2x a week. 🙂

      • sewcute says:

        Can I mix up a batch of this and just use it as needed? or will I need to make it up each time I shower?

        How often should I wash my hair using this? Right now I am washing my hair every other day, should I stick with that? or more or less?

      • Anonymous says:

        Wow thanks for this. I am happy to give it a go. I tried it once before but my hair got super greasy. It is longer now though so I could tie it up. I do get my hair high-lighted though and they wash it with LOTS of shampoo when I go. I guess I would just use bicarb in betweeen colourings which is every 4 months or so. I will recommend this to my teens too!

        • femcatt says:

          I get my hair cut at Aveda, which is a organically-oriented salon/school, I have them skip the shampoo and just rinse my hair with water, and they are happy to oblige and usually interested in learning more about my hair care methods. The only drawback is that I miss out on the scalp massage because they use a massage oil that is meant to be washed out at the shampoo step.

          I used to go to a different salon/school that was a little bit cheaper, but switched to the only slightly more expensive Aveda after a stylist gave me a really snooty attitude about not wanting to put a bunch of chemical junk in my hair and told me that keeping hair clean and healthy without these products was impossible. (Boooo)

    • Anonymous says:

      if you want to go natural, why don’t you just……

      use organic shampoo. If you’re only worried about the chemicals whole foods has what you need. money’s another issue, but if you’re only worried about the health factor, go organic

      • Anonymous says:

        Re: if you want to go natural, why don’t you just……

        I shopped Whole Foods today, and still couldn’t find any shampoo that was free of irritants. Just because the ingredients are organic, doesn’t meant they are gentle. Normally I would agree, but I just lost about a third of my hair in a month, so I want to eliminate all irritants and see what happens. I already had a complete blood workup from my doctor, and everything is normal. If this doesn’t work, I have to assume it’s stress. But I tried the BS this morning, and already today I’m losing fewer strands and my scalp feels better. My hair looked great too. This is a great place to check the ingredients in products, http://www.cosmeticsdatabase.com and this is a handy list of toxic ingredients https://ulew.mionegroup.com/toxic.

        I did find ONE clean product after looking ALL DAY Sunday, but I’m going to try BC/ACV first. http://www.curlmart.com/store/product.php?productid=694&cat=51&page=1

        Thank you, Babyslime, for the very useful information!

        • halomouse says:

          Re: if you want to go natural, why don’t you just……

          I just lost about a third of my hair in a month, so I want to eliminate all irritants and see what happens. I already had a complete blood workup from my doctor, and everything is normal. If this doesn’t work, I have to assume it’s stress.

          Or alopecia. I’ve known a couple people who’ve had it — for one, her hair grew back several years later, for the other, it never has (and that was several decades ago). Stress has gotten attention as a possible culprit, but unless things have changed, it’s pretty poorly understood/researched. Best of luck to you and your hair, though. 🙂

  • thesqueak says:

    Great explanation! I’m considering going shampoo-free now. (Found this post through .)
    One question for you, though – you said you’re sensitive to some ingredients in henna. What ingredients are you sensitive to? I’ve only used pure henna and water, and have had no problems whatsoever, and from what I understand, henna is a very rare allergy (and the only way to know you have it is if you start having tightness in your chest – it doesn’t cause any surface irritation.) Did you use pre-mixed henna, maybe? The right way to buy it is in powdered leaf form, otherwise who knows what’s in it – I’ve had reactions to pre-mixed stuff, but never to the henna itself.
    But, anyways, thanks for posting this!

    • admin says:

      It’s been a long, long time since I tried to use it and honestly I couldn’t tell you what “type” I bought. Although I’m not sure if that’s true, that you can only react a certain way. As someone with many, many, many (MANY) allergies, I know that there are a variety of different reactions you can have. Some mental, some physical.
      At the time of the usage, I was still suffering with life-threatening reactions to plant matter and did not think dead matter would affect me. However, my flora allergies have since lessoned once I had a baby and I haven’t tried again. 🙂

      You found it through wedding plans? Really? Wow, this really is getting around!

  • trillian42 says:

    Hi! I can’t remember how I found this post originally, but I memoried it and am planning on trying the no-poo after an upcoming trip. I had a couple questions —

    Can you go straight from shampooing regularly to this, or is it better to give your hair a few days to “recover” from shampooing before trying this?

    Can you add any kind of scent oils to the ACV rinse to make it smell less nasty? I hate the smell of that stuff, but I don’t want to mess up the balance.

    What do you do if your hair picks up smells easily? Like, if I go to the shore, I smell like salt water for a couple days, even if I haven’t been in the water, or if I go to a club or bar I REEK of cigg smoke. Does this get that kind of thing out well?

    Thank you!

    • admin says:

      Hi there! Thanks for dropping by.

      I’ve found the transition is better if you give your hair a few days to detox from the shampoo before diving in. DON’T overdo the BS/ACV if your hair is greasy, because too much BS can make your hair very dry.
      You can add oils to the ACV, but remember it’s heavily diluted already and you will not have a smell on your hair – it rinses clean. 🙂 But I know what you mean, I can’t STAND the smell of vinegar!
      Some people infuse the rinse with tea, herbs or essential oils and find that works well for them. 🙂

      And yes, this will get smells out easily. But remember that about 90% of dirt and smells will wash out with just warm water and a finger scrub. It’s a good idea that if you take a daily shower, to do a warm water massage daily just to get rid of anything from day-to-day living and then do your BS/ACV set whenever your hair really needs it.
      For me, I needed it around once a week, until recently (it’s coming into summer) and now I’ve had to change it to 2x a week and add a tich more baking soda to my mix. As your hair changes, so will your routine, so be flexible. 🙂

  • the_leh says:

    This is an awesome post! I might try this.

    Btw, there are shampoos and conditioners that don’t strip the natrual oils from your hair (at least, not as far as I can tell) and do not contain mineral oil, SLS or SLFS. The ones I use are by Avalon Organics (you can get them at Whole Foods here in the states) and they contain 100% vegetarian ingredients and all herbs are organically grown. But they don’t save the pocketbook like vinigar and baking soda would 😀

  • dimelo says:

    This is an excellent post; thank you for sharing so much information. I’ll definitely be trying this.

    One observation: I think you’re missing the phrase “baking soda” here.

    How do I go shampoo free?
    Use one tablespoon per one cup of warm or hot water.

    When I read it I got confused… thought for a minute you meant one tablespoon of shampoo per cup of water, as if I were to gradually wean myself off the stuff by diluting it!

  • Sorry to bug…

    I have fairly difficult hair (kinky-curls, long, uber-thick), and am dependent on about a dozen different products to keep it in check. You said that this works for super long, super curly hair as well, but I can’t even manage the first step for long hair (“Comb your hair from scalp to tips before you go into the shower to loosen dirt and detangle”) without risk of breaking the comb and frizzing out my hair more than it already is. I’m not sure where to even start. o.O

    • admin says:

      Re: Sorry to bug…

      My hair used to be down to my butt before I cut it all off. 😉 The best way to brush is actually from bottom up. Do the last inch or so, then gradually work your way up until you can comb all the way through from scalp down. Use a very wide-toothed brush if you have long and or kinky hair (or both). But don’t whip all your hair to one side, or over your shoulder, that will cause split-ends and damage. If you can’t manage it without doing this, ask someone to help you out.

      • the_wanlorn says:

        Re: Sorry to bug…

        Er, I know that this post is almost two years old, but I was recently linked to it, and have no sense of common decency that says commenting on old posts is not the coolest thing to do.

        How does whipping all your hair to over your shoulder cause split ends and damage? I brush my hair by bringing it all over my shoulder so that it hangs down the front so I can see what I’m doing.

        I believe you, I’m just a curious bugger that likes to know the how and why of things. 😛

        • admin says:

          Re: Sorry to bug…

          As far as I remember, it’s about the stress of pulling your hair around your neck. While the hair from the same side isn’t going to feel any damage, the hair that’s been pulled around to the other side is stressed and brushing it that way is causing too much tension, which makes it fray and break.
          Similar theory as why repeated ponytails damage your hair.

    • linmayu says:

      I’ve got curly hair too and the method does need to be modified for curly hair. Don’t worry about detangling before you go in the shower, do it when you have the ACV rinse in your hair. That makes it easier. I also use a wide tooth paddle brush instead of a comb.

  • manawolf says:

    Yet another from the longhair community….

    Will baking powder (double action) function equivalently to baking soda? (It’s what’s in my cabinet, and I’m close to flat broke right now so I’d rather use what I have if possible.)

    😛

  • miraclaire says:

    i found this from . This is great!! Thanks!!

  • tree says:

    i found this link from and just wanted to say thankyou for the great information. baking soda and vinegar are almost the only two things you would ever need to live chemically free 🙂

  • idiolecto says:

    I just wanted to let you know that I made up some bottles of shampoo and conditioner using your recipes for my husband for Christmas and it was his favorite present. He’s been using it ever since with very good results. Maybe I too will switch over soon!

  • plunkybug says:

    Also from naturalliving…

    I have been using a few sls free shampoos/conditioners (Jason Hemp, Avalon Organics Clarifying, and KMF Organics Daily/Lightweight) for a while in rotation, depending on what I want when I wash. I have also used Burt’s Bees Avocado Hair Treatment and Feelin’ Flaky shampoo in the past. I also use Herbavita hair dye. I choose no henna as I don’t want to go red; I want to stay a little closer to my natural color (medium ash blonde, and I darken to natural dark blonde). I am a little confused at what happens with dyed hair. I am in FL and it looks like we are in one of the 2 middle feilds for hardness. My hair is little longer than shoulder lentgh (though I may be cutting it shorter this weekend), somewhat dry and frizzy by nature, and wavy curly nearer to the ends. So, what would be best for me, to stay with what I am using, or to try this? Sorry for the ramblings.

    • plunkybug says:

      Re: Also from naturalliving…

      sorry for my typos

    • admin says:

      Re: Also from naturalliving…

      When you’re using this method, you’ll find you need to use it MUCH less then you would conventional shampoos. Baking soda can be harsh if you use too much, or overuse it (IE. every day) and would strip colour much faster.

      However, once you’ve found your niche, you’ll probably be using it 1-2x per week maximum, even with that length hair. People with curly hair may actually find they need to wash less (although, do expect to loose some length due to waves/curls tightening when your hair returns to a natural state).
      If you’re using it infrequently, you may find your colour lasts longer. This, of course, applies with permanent colour… I really don’t know how it would deal with wash-out.

      When I used to dye my hair on a regular basis, I always would go without washing 3-4 days after I dyed it to let it ‘set’. I found the colour was better that way. However, my hair would get real greasy because I was a shampoo/conditioner addict. I haven’t tried dying my hair in about a year or more, so I don’t have any personal experience yet.

      • plunkybug says:

        Re: Also from naturalliving…

        As it stands now, I wash once or twice a week, or wenever it feels icky and greasy. I think the Hebavita is permanent. I always use the conditioner pack after and I think they suggest you shampoo. I sometimes use a tiny amount, and let it goes as many days as I can before washing…there is that just dyed feel that I can’t get rid of until it goes away on its own. I may try this. As long as I feel relatively confident it won’t weaken the hair color.

        How exactly do you apply the bs and acv mixes to the hair without losing much of the mixture? The bs is more pasty, but the acv I would expect to be runny.

        • admin says:

          Re: Also from naturalliving…

          Actually, the BS mix isn’t pasty at all, it’s like cloudy water. It’s the letting it sit a moment and massaging WELL into your scalp that you’ll start to feel the difference (the BS mix will start to feel kind of slippery on your hair after a moment of massaging in).

          I have two completely cleaned out shampoo bottles that I use. I got a funnel and put 1 Tablespoon baking soda and one cup hot water in, and then doubled it. Shook it all around.
          Then with the vinegar I put 1.5 tablespoons per cup of cold water, and doubled it. Shook it around.

          When I wash I just squirt some of the baking soda mix on my hair. I do little squirts right on my scalp here and there, then start massaging. I massage into my scalp for about a minute and then wash out with warm water.
          I do the same with the ACV rinse. Squirt here and there, massage, and rinse out with cold or tepid water. I always do the ACV rinse JUST as I leave the shower so I don’t have to sit in non-warm water. I love my hot showers. 😉

          • plunkybug says:

            Re: Also from naturalliving…

            How much from each of the bottles do you use on your short hair for each use? Does the bs mix stay on the hair well? How long did it take for you to notice a difference?

            • admin says:

              Re: Also from naturalliving…

              I probably use about 1/8th of a cup (I’m just guessing). My husband has shorter hair and uses more, because he’s not as skilled with getting the mixture around and tends to just kind of pour it on his head. So, it really depends on your method.

              Neither mix stays on your hair the way shampoo or conditioner does, you just kind of have to feel your way through until you get the hang of it. Think about getting it right down to your scalp as you’re rubbing it in, and with the BS mixture particularly you will *feel* it in your hair after a moment of rubbing.

              I noticed a differnece after the very first wash, as do most people. Those who don’t notice it right away will note a difference within a week. 🙂

  • empress544 says:

    hi, i’m from ….

    this sounds like something i’d like to try, especially since my hair seems to be getting weaker, and i have split ends and it breaks easily.

    i have long hair, but i’m trying to grow it longer, for the herbs that you mentioned do you have any experience with them, and if not where did you get the information?

    • admin says:

      Hi there,
      I have minimal experience with the herbs thus far. I got my information from the websites I linked to, from MDC forums (where there are threads of HUNDREDS of women who are doing it, teaching it to others, trying things, some are herbalists, etc…) and a few other natural forums.

      My hair is very short right now, but I know quite a few people personally who are succeeding at it with long hair, and even super, super curly hair.

  • Anonymous says:

    ? about the mixtures

    Babs- when you say to use one TBS of baking soda to one cup of water, is that per washing, or just the ratio for the solution? Same ? for the apple cider vinegar. Thanks.

    • admin says:

      Re: ? about the mixtures

      For both it’s just the ratio of the solution. I find that a cup of the ACV mix lasts me a long time, and a cup of the baking soda mix not quite as long (I think I just use more each time). Although in a month I’ve only had to refill my little bottles once.

      • Anonymous says:

        Re: ? about the mixtures

        OH! I read what you wrote and I was putting 1 tbs in one cup of water and using the whole thing on my hair each time I “washed” (about 2X per week)… is that too much. I’m re-reading and thinking that maybe I was supposed to mix it, and only use part of it each time I shower…
        Am I doing this right… I’ve been shampoo free about a month now, and my hair SEEMS fine, not greasy, but it is a little static-y (but it’s winter up here in Canada and we always get a little dried out from the heating and all).. any suggestions?
        Kudos on a great site!!!
        Shannon in QC

        • admin says:

          Re: ? about the mixtures

          As long as the dilution remains the same, it doesn’t really matter how much of it you use – because your hair’s exposure remains constant. 🙂
          I’m also up in Canada, and I don’t notice any static. You can always try adjusting your dilutions just slightly to see if one works better for you (eg. When pregnant I find that using 1.5 tbs baking soda to 1cup of water works better).

          • Anonymous says:

            Re: ? about the mixtures

            Thanks so much! I actually have pretty hard water, so I got DH to put some salt in that machine and run it through a couple of times, made a big difference… and I also tried the ACV rince this time and I’m STUNNED at how light my hair feels…
            I’d heard of this 6+ years ago, but was never brave enough… now I can’t kick myself hard enough for not taking the plunge sooner! The whole family (that’s even my two teens, both of whom had terribly greasy hair with lots of dandruff and stuff, have said how much they love thier hair now, no more flakes at all.. and the grease is totally under control… and my Littles are sweet smelling, not perfumy smelling… so nice!).
            Thank you for blessing the world with your blog…
            Shannon in QC

  • admin says:

    I don’t know much about permed hair – and coloured hair FAQ is in there… I can’t imagine that occassional use would undo your perm, though.

  • kris1225 says:

    how often?

    how often should you wash with baking soda (especially in the beginning)?

    GREAT INFO!!

  • salisya says:

    Wanna ship me some baking soda???

    It is not sold the same whay here. It is a tiny tiny package for more than it is worth here. 🙁

    I’m gonna try it anyway, but this sucks!!!

  • i_got_it says:

    thanks so much… this has a lot of information and is extremely helpful.

    i only have one concern though, i have *very* soft hair, and it’s very stretchy and is also between being wavy and curly. i’m worried about trying the treatment because my hair is so soft. any advice?

    • admin says:

      I don’t see why it would be a problem! If you have wavy/curly hair, be aware that you can loose some length because without shampoo/conditioner weighing it down your curls /waves will become tighter.

  • the_waker says:

    Oh thank you! I’m definitly trying this after the holidays, I’d rather not be oily haired the one time of the year I see certain relatives 😉

    Added to memories 😀

  • oops!

    I meant to leave my “wow!” comment here 🙂

  • This is very interesting. Thank you for taking the time to research all of this and write it out. Certainly food for thought!

  • thinggtwoo says:

    AMAZING amounts of information here – Great job, and thank you! Here’s my question – do you use this formula on Tempest’s hair? My Toddler’s hair actually does look/get greasy after several days of not shampooing; but I’d love to use this with her, too, and my husband! Does Curtis use it?

    • admin says:

      Ah, but have you been shampooing your toddler’s hair? 😉 That’s the kicker. If you HAVEN’T, ever, you’ll probably notice that it doesn’t get greasy – that’s what the line reads.

      Curtis uses it, yes. He has oily hair, and I have dry.
      Tempest doesn’t use it. I’ve never had to shampoo or really wash her hair… Warm water usually does the trick. If there’s something icky in it that I need to wash out, I use a tich of baking soda, and on occassion a burt’s bees bar.

      • I hadn’t actually realized this before, but neither of my sons like shampoo (results of using it is generally extremely noisy), so they aren’t using it often – and the younger’s hair is still mostly fluff. He’s two. The older’s had more shampoos, though… and he goes greasyish.

      • Anonymous says:

        hardly ever 😀

        I never wash the kids hair… sometimes they ask for it to be washed, and I use a shampoo bar soap, but otherwise Their hair is never greasy or dirty looking. Talk about easy!! Another bonus, is lice doesnt like “dirty” hair :woot so far so good

  • This is so exciting, I intend to try it as soon as I can. One question though: for the hairsprays and gels, do the rinds of the lemons (or orange) go into the boiling water? or only the fruit part?

    I’ve been reading your journal for about 3 weeks now after seeing the snow pictures on livejournal’s latest posts, and am enjoying it very much. I was raised in a similar natural way that you are trying to raise Tempest (although, it is was, of course, different) And I am gathering all this information for some day when I have kids (even though I am still too young for that (19))

    Anyhow, I enjoy your pictures and your thoughts, and this is too exciting to not comment on.

    • admin says:

      😀 Thank you so much!
      I actually haven’t made the hairsprays/gels before, but since they don’t say to juice it, and you are straining it, I’d imagine that you’re putting the rind in… Thankfully, lemons and citrus are usually pretty cheap so you can afford to hazard a guess. 😉

  • _melly says:

    Dont you know I was telling my class about this today and they were making fun of me? Telling me it was a crock and everything. Well I tryed it and it works and my doctor said it’s true to. Those people I go to school hope to one day call themselves medical professionals..hmm makes ya wonder.

    Thanks, (runs to add to memories!)

    • admin says:

      People are insanely brainwashed by the media, so I wouldn’t take it so hard. 😉
      What class do you teach??

      • _melly says:

        Actually I’m a nursing student. These were people in my RN class. Who definatly are brainwashed by the media, do you believe none of them believe in home birthing or breastfeeding except for my friend and me. I think thats crazy, they all believe babies should be birthed in a hospital with medical professionals all around and the breastfeeding is sick. Let me tell you, I get into a debate almost everyday and glad to say, win them! 🙂 People these days are so closed minded I don’t know how they are going to work with/helping

        • _melly says:

          ..people ( i forgot that! )

        • admin says:

          I’m glad you’re winning! 😉 Someone is probably hearing it, even if they don’t want to. You never know if your words are making an impact.

          That’s sad though, what they all believe… although somehow it doesn’t surprise me. 🙁 I’m glad you’re a nursing student – the world needs more like you!

          • _melly says:

            Aww thanks, in addition to my RN I’m going for lactation colsultant to so I can give new moms advice and help them with their nursing and be more utilized then just the average RN. I hope to go back in a few years to become a Nurse Practioner because I want to deliever babies and take care of new moms and give them my knowledge. But if I dont get into GYN I definatly want to work for a pediatrician.

            • admin says:

              Wow! That’s awesome! Way to go. 😀 Tons of support your way to achieve those goals. You’d be fantastic.

            • Anonymous says:

              Thank goodness! The world certainly does need more like you. I don’t know if I want to have children, but I do know that if I do, I will be having a natural birth at home with a NP there to oversee it. People don’t realize how hospitals are businesses in the end, and don’t always have people’s best interest in mind. I found out a lot about this from The Business of Being Born, a documentary, and afterwards I just googled. You’ll be sick after seeing how little regard they have for what’s best for you and your child.
              -Samantha

  • hibernate says:

    This sounds really interesting. Thanks for typing it up!

    Stupid question: is baking soda the same thing as sodium bicarbonate? That language barrier again…

      • Anonymous says:

        Hey it’s not the same. Sodium Bicarbonat is only a part of Baking Soda…I wonder if that is why some people have problems. They just ‘overdose’ when they use 2 tsp of sodium bicarbonat instead of the same amount of bs.

        • souterrain says:

          No, baking soda really is sodium bicarbonate a.k.a. sodium hydrogen carbonate a.k.a. NaHCO3.

          You may be confusing baking powder with baking soda. Baking powder is sodium bicarb with an added acid and a starch.

          One probably does not want to use baking powder in one’s hair. 😉

          • brno says:

            Though this is a comment from long ago

            Sodium bicarbonate is Na(CO3)2.
            Sodium hydrogen carbonate is NaHCO3.
            The difference is little, though. Pretty much only in acidity level, I guess.

            But baking powder is completely another deal, you are right.

            • souterrain says:

              Re: Though this is a comment from long ago

              Sodium bicarbonate is Sodium hydrogencarbonate, NaHCO3, not Na(CO3)2. See the Wikipedia article on Sodium bicarbonate.

              Not that anyone in this community cares about molecular formulas. 😉

              • brno says:

                My apologies

                First of all, I meant Na2CO3, not what Na(C03)2 (which is outright BS).
                Second, it looks like ambiguous English words have been fooling me. Why would NaHCO3 be called bicarbonate? What so “bi” about it? That doesn’t make sense (you would think one would stop implying there is sense in everything).
                Third, thanks for pointing that out for me.
                Fourth, I hope this thread is so old, nobody will find me being publicly shamed here 🙂

                • Use of “bi” in chemistry

                  Actually in chemistry, the “bi” is an old fashioned way of referring to the hydrogen. This, I remember from high school chemistry. Two of something uses the Greek prefix “di” as in carbon dioxide.

                  • redrall says:

                    Re: Use of “bi” in chemistry

                    I looked this up. It’s called bicarbonate because we’re dealing with ionic compounds here. With an ordinary carbonate, such as the aforementioned Na2CO3, once you dissolve it in water (H2O) you have a solution of 2 parts sodium hydroxide (2NaOH) and one part carbonic acid (H2CO3).

                    But if you have a bicarbonate, say NaHCO3, you have a different set of ions, and you end up with one part sodium hydroxide and one part, let’s see, hydrogen + HCO3 = again carbonic acid!

                    The proportion of carbonic acid to sodium hydroxide is twice as much as before, hence bi-carbonate.

    • admin says:

      BTW, I *adore* that icon, it’s you, right? You look gorgeous.

    • Anonymous says:

      yes. baking soda is the same thing as sodium bicarbonate.

    • Anonymous says:

      Shampoo Free

      I have known about using bakins soda to strip the medicines and such off of you hair for years. Especially in older people who take lots of different meds (younger ones too), who are going to get a perm, be sure to use baking soda to wash you hair with. You perm will do better and last longer.

      Debbie J
      East Texas

  • jucifer says:

    thank u!
    (adding to memories :))

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